Way back when, Wednesdays

Funky fashion arrives in the North East

The days are getting shorter and the Autumn/Winter fashions are now in the stores. Let’s have a look at what people were wearing in 1971. The North East Leader, a Messenger Newspaper covered the coolest threads on offer for men, women and boys, from pages 36 – 37 of the edition dated 14 July 1971.

Knitted suits for men

Yes, these photographs are real. Perhaps these brands of menswear should have been labelled with a hazard warning “Wearing this garment may compel doe-eyed women to hang themselves precariously off your person at any given opportunity.”

Mens fashions knit shirt

These articles focused on how it was essential for a man to be stylish if he wanted to be admired and attract a lady companion. The photographs are over the top by modern standards but we all know that the advertising industry still uses sex appeal and prestige to sell products! John Brown’s smart knitted suits for casual and weekend wear were styled following overseas trends. Note the focus on Australian manufacture, no doubt using fine Australian wool. Maybe these women are not really gazing adoringly up at the male models – they are really just feeling the texture of these garments. For as the article states, women might be coveting the clothing for themselves!

A married man would make his wife’s life at home a lot easier if he chose to wear modern, easy care drip dry fabrics. Synthetic fabrics had been popular during the 1960s. These colourful and distinctive knit shirts in the ‘Summerknits’ range by John Brown were made from high tech fabrics such as Tricel and Teteron.

 

hotpants in crimplene

Conversely, the ladies modelling a new range of women’s clothing don’t need men as accessories in these photoshoots. Wearing funky hotpants, this girl is confident, in style and ready to have fun.

During the 1970s fashions changed greatly from the beginning of the decade to its end. In 1971 the fashions were very much like those of 1969. Garments made from polyester were popular as they were inexpensive and did not need ironing. Bright colours and bold prints were still in demand. Checks and tweeds were in vogue too.

 

Lady with silver buckle

Distinctive fashions by young Prue Acton, the first Australian designer to break into the American market.  Prue embraced both new synthetic and natural fibres, to create her bold and colourful designs (https://collections.museumvictoria.com.au/articles/2377).

 

Young women still liked mini-skirts but long, flowing skirts were also worn. Fashion continued to be influenced by the hippie era and ethnic influence of the late 1960s. Women wore long bohemian print dresses with billowing sleeves. Men’s loose shirts in floral patterns had ties around the neck or an open neckline. Not forgetting the leather sandals and scarves tied around your head. And hippie men wore beards and long hair.
Turtleneck jumpers were popular with both sexes and every woman owned at least one cowl neck jumper, to wear with pants or under a pinafore dress. Ladies still liked trendy short hair styles. But long hair might be worn down loose, plaited or dressed in a soft, bohemian up-style for a natural look. Or you could set it in waves.

Another trend emerged – the 1970s was the first decade where women wore pants and pantsuits for work and leisure. Women could wear jeans at home and elegant or trendy pants to a nightclub or restaurant. Some dress codes allowed women to wear business suits with pants to the office. By the end of the decade, women could basically wear what they wanted, which was revolutionary (https://www.retrowaste.com/1970s/fashion-in-the-1970s/1970s-fashion-for-women-girls/).  Trousers for both men and women were low rise, firm on the hips and with a wider leg which was sometimes cuffed. Corduroy clothing or men and women such as jeans, and sports coats with wide lapels, were seen everywhere (http://www.thepeoplehistory.com/1971fashions.html).

 

boys 2

Knitwear and shirts by John Brown for little men, made from machine washable wool.

#waybackwhenwednesdays

 

Sue’s sticky date pudding recipe

Yum. Sue the chef from Bake & Brew, next door to Tea Tree Gully Library, has given us her recipe for a winter classic: sticky date pudding with creamy butterscotch sauce.

sticky date pudding

A sweet, gooey classic for winter

This recipe is one of Sue’s faves. She developed the recipe as a young chef working at the Four Seasons Hotel in Sydney and contributed it to a community cookbook. She has made it for dessert at several weddings and continues to make it for Bake & Brew customers.

Here’s what you need to do to make sticky date pudding ASAP:

Sue’s Sticky Date Pudding with Butterscotch Sauce

Ingredients

Pudding
170gm pitted dates
300ml water
1 tsp bicarb soda
60gm butter
170gm castor sugar
2 eggs
1/2 tsp vanilla
170gm SR flour
60gm walnuts

Sauce
200gm brown sugar
130gm butter
150ml cream
1/2 tsp vanilla
50ml brandy (optional)

Method
Bring dates and water to the boil. Simmer for a few minutes. Remove from heat and add bicarb soda. Leave to cool. (You could do this the day before serving, and keep it in the fridge).

Cream the butter and sugar, add eggs, vanilla and date mix. Fold in the flour and chopped walnuts.

Bake in a 160 degree oven for 40 minutes until firm to touch. A round 20cm cake tin is ideal, and you can also use individual moulds.

For the sauce, bring all ingredients to the boil and simmer for 2 minutes until cool.

If you make a big batch, you can always can reheat the puddings in the microwave for a sweet treat all week.

Scandinavian stitching

Are you addicted to watching Nordic Noir?  A fan of Scandinavian crime drama such as The Killing, The Bridge, Wallander, The Eagle, Unit One or Anna Pihl?  In which the northern weather always seems to be bleak, dark and cold to match the melancholy of the setting?  Remember, our winter is coming and soon we too will feel the chill of bitter winds.  While you sitting immersed in these crime DVDs, why not prepare for the cooler weather by making something warm?  Or just try out some Nordic themed needlecrafts? You can reserve all of these titles through the One Card Network online catalogue, or enquire next time you visit the Library.

Nordic knitting traditionsNordic Knitting Traditions, 25 Scandinavian, Icelandic and Fair Isle Accessories. By Susan Anderson-Freed.

Knit hats, gloves, mittens, socks and leg warmers.

 

 

Quick Icelandic Knits

Quick Icelandic Knits.  Sweaters, Hats, Socks, Mittens and more.  By Gun Birgirsdottir.  Lots of woolly jumpers!

Includes instructions for felted hats, childrens’ slippers and bags.

 

 

Strikketoj

Strikketoj.  Knitting Designs inspired by the Pop Culture of the 20th Century.  By Helga Isager.

Helga Isager interprets fashion trends from 1900 to 1990  in fresh contemporary designs.

 

 

 

Knitting Scandinavian Slippers and Socks

 

Knitting Scandinavian Slippers and Socks.  By Laura Farson.

 

 

 

 

Baby knitsBaby knits from around the world : 20 heirloom projects in a variety of styles and techniques.  Edited by Kari Cornell.

Knitting patterns for infant’s clothing from around the world, including knits of Scandinavia.

 

Swedish knitsSwedish knits : classic and modern designs in the Scandinavian tradition.  Written by Paula Hammerskog and Eva Wincent ; photos by Rikard Westman.

 

 

 

Nordic crafts Nordic crafts : over 30 projects inspired by Scandinavian            style.  By Mia Underwood.

 

 

 

Northern Knits Northern Knits : designs inspired by the knitting traditions of Scandinavia, Iceland, and the Shetland Isles.   By Lucinda Guy.

 

 

 

Scandinavian needlecraftScandinavian needlecraft : 35 step-by-step projects to create the Scandinavian home.

Make some lovely things with simple elegant motifs, such as the felt bag on the cover.

 

Knitting in the Nordic TraditionKnitting in the Nordic tradition.  By Vibeke Lind.  English translation by Annette Allen Jensen.

 

 

 

150 Scandinavian knitting designs150 Scandinavian knitting designs.  By Mary Jane Mucklestone.

Authentic designs with acual-size swatches, charts and alternative colourways.

 

Norwegian Knits with a Twist Norwegian knits with a twist.  Socks, Sweaters, Mittens, Hats, Pillows, Blankets and a Whole Lot More.  By Arne & Carlos.

Traditional embroidery, tapestry, and knitting motifs from Setesdal, in the south of Norway, are brilliantly re-conceived in this fabulously fresh collection of knitting projects from Arne and Carlos.

 

Crochet Scandinavian StyleCrochet : Scandinavian style.  By Eva Wincent & Paula Hammerskog.

Scandinavian designs in red and white : craft and sew 55 beautiful projects for the home.  By Nadja Knab-Leers, Heike Roland, Stefanie Thomas.

 

 

The Killing HandbookThe Killing Handbook : Forbrydelsen forever!  By Emma Kennedy [foreword by Sofie Grabol].

Includes a knitting pattern for the Faroe Islands jumper worn by detective Sarah Lund in the Danish television series The Killing.