Way back when, Wednesdays

A bigger, better library

In its first incarnation, the Tea Tree Gully Library was a bookmobile. The ‘Municipal Library’ began operating in June 1965. It was a bus that serviced the local community by visiting locations around the local district, Inglewood and Houghton, such as shopping centres, the Council Civic Centre, schools and the Highbury hotel. At this time, Tea Tree Gully had a population of approximately 16,000 residents scattered over an area of 55 square miles. By 1968 the population had increased to 27,000 and Tea Tree Gully had officially been declared a City. The Library’s book stock and the number of borrowers had also increased substantially, making conditions cramped inside the mobile library. Due to its age and poor mechanical condition the bus had to be retired.

Public Library

So the official opening of a new public library made front page news in the North East Leader, a Messenger newspaper on 5 March 1969. The Library was housed in the building which was formerly the Modbury Primary School and headmaster’s cottage, which is now designated as 561 Montague Road, Modbury. It was small compared with our modern library facilities but it had high ceilings, fireplaces and was of solid construction. However, I recall a former Library staff member who worked in the old building shelving books after school commenting that it was cold and that there were mice!

The North East Leader article provides us with some interesting statistics relating to the amount of book stock held by the Library, the number of loans and membership in 1969. Naturally the demand for library services has increased over time. Since 1969 the Tea Tree Gully Library has serviced the community at three other locations. The Library opened on 17 December 1975 at 1020 North East Road, Modbury, adjacent the former Civic Centre and on 28 July 1991 at 98 Smart Road, Modbury, in a joint-use agreement with the Torrens Valley Institute of TAFE. Things have changed quite a bit since the Tea Tree Gully Library moved to our current premises in the Civic Centre at 571 Montague Road in 2003.

As of September 2017 the City of Tea Tree Gully Library has approximately 118,000 items in stock, including not only books and magazines, but also many audiovisual materials which did not exist in 1969. As part of the One Card Library network we can offer our customers infinitely more choice.   On average, the Library issues 75,000 loans per month. We have 28,500 members who have borrowed in the last three years and we enroll around 266 new people per month.

The heritage listed Modbury School House building has been transformed into the Sfera’s 1877 Restaurant which commenced business in 2004. Sfera’s 1877 Restaurant offers fine dining and serves Italian cuisine.

#waybackwhenwednesdays

Who were YOU in the 1990s?

Celebrate SA History month this May

staff montage

Recognise a few faces in this montage?This May we’re having a Ninetiespalooza in the library. There’s a call out to customers to send us their 1990s photos, to add to our ‘Who were YOU in the 1990s?’ photo album.

Staff from Tea Tree Gully Library have blown the dust off their old photo albums and uncovered evidence of their 90s lives. There’s baby snaps, school days, frilly formals, moody university shots and of course, the daggy family photos – everyone’s got one it seems.

You can also relive 90s video games from May 16-22, when a special Timezone parlour will be set up in the library.

You may also enjoy:

  • Author talk: Women at Gallipoli
    Tuesday 10 May
    Historian and author John Howell will speak about the role of women in the Gallipoli conflict
  • Brandy to box wine: a history of Angoves Tea Tree Gully 
    Wednesday 11 May
    Join wine expert Roger Wyatt for a fun and informative evening that will look at the history of wine
  • History at 100km per hour
    Friday 13 May
    Uncover the history of one of Adelaide’s greatest transport systems as you speed along the O-Bahn.
During History Month this May, loads of events will be taking place all over South Australia, including walks, talks, tours, exhibitions and performances, in what is the biggest program ever.Download the free app ‘History Festival’ for iOS and Android and use it to plan your itinerary, receive event reminders, get directions, make a booking and more.

SA History Festival Manager Allison Russell says, ‘Make the most of May: it is your best chance for time travel.’ It’s one of the best times of the year to get stuck into the history of the incredibly rich and diverse state that is South Australia.

See the full SA History Month program here

Tea trees and eucalyptus

Many types of eucalyptus trees frame the Library’s setting here in Tea Tree Gully. They cluster together to form a shady space for our patrons to wander through and enjoy a quiet spot to read or eat a meal.

The eucalyptus tereticornis

The eucalyptus tereticornis

Tea Tree Gully was named for its abundance of white flowered ‘tea trees’  (Leptospermum lanigerum) that grew in the creeks. Their leaves were brewed as a tea substitute by early settlers.

Blue gums, river red gums and grey gums are just some of the eucalyptus you can see here. Their heady scent is one of the best things about the walk into the library.

Gorgeous pink flowers of a eucalyptus, at their peak in summer

Gorgeous pink flowers of a eucalyptus, at their peak in summer

Summer seems to be the season for gum trees. With leaves illuminated by Aussie sunshine, and their colourful floral bouquets, they are truly looking their best right now.

If you love eucalyptus trees, come into the Tea Tree Gully Library and leaf through (pun intended) our many books on gum trees, or put a hold on them online. Many books also provide practical household tips on how to use eucalyptus oil for cleaning and therapeutic uses.

Men and Mo’s in Tea Tree Gully

Men, moustaches and Tea Tree Gully have a long history together.  Throughout Movember, Tea Tree Gully Library will be hosting a display of photographs and trivia facts to pay tribute to the moustache’s cultural relevance throughout time.

For 150 years the moustache has played a significant part in the development of the City. With glory days in the nineteenth century and a revival in the 1970s, the mo has adorned the upper lips of many men in the community…and we have the photos to prove it.

Where's YOUR moustache?

Where’s YOUR moustache?

In fact shaving with stone razors dates back to Neolithic times – the oldest documented image of a man with a moustache is a Scythian horseman from 300 B.C.

The Local History photo collection has been well scrutinised to unearth a handsome selection of images for a photographic moustache feast of hair quality, colour, style, length and creativity.

The exhibition is a free event and donation tins will be provided if you wish to support men’s health charities in Movember.