Library Goober makes TV show!

Former Tea Tree Gully Library staff member, Ben Crisp, has had a series he wrote turned into a webseries on ABC iview.

The series, called Goober, is a short form comedy documenting the life of Harry, an Uber driver on the autism spectrum. “Harry loves his life, he loves his job, and he loves his gooberpassengers: so much, that he wants every one of them to be his next best friend. Goober is a light-hearted comedy series about a man who sees the best in every situation, despite what everyone else sees. It demonstrates that first impressions don’t always tell the whole story: Harry seems unusual due to the way his autism shapes his interactions, but, more often than not, his candor and naivety expose the hypocrisy of the “everyday” people around him.”

We caught up with Ben to ask him about Goober and to keep in contact in case he turns into a full-fledged success who might be worth mooching off of in the future.

TTG Library:   Congratulations on Goober. The Library is incredibly proud to have one of our own produce such a great show.

Ben:    Thank you so much!

TTG Library: Firstly is it pronounced Goober or Gūber?

Ben: Actually it’s spelt Goober but it’s pronounced Throatwobbler Mangrove. No, Harry the Uber-driver is definitely a “goober”: a loveable goofball who means well, but tends to get it wrong more than right.

TTG Library: Why isn’t it spelled Gūber then?

Ben: We considered it briefly, but thought that people might see the name and think it was a foreign-language show. Or misread it and think it was about the Gruber brothers, Hans and Simon Peter—you know, the bad guys from Die Hard 1 and 3. Actually that would be a pretty cool show too now that I think about it.

[we all think it would be a great show too, you could call it Now I Have a Gruber! – start writing]

TTG Library: In a lot of ways Gūber would have been funnier, do you now regret not spelling it that way?

Ben: We choose to listen to our fans, not our diacritics.

TTG Library: You are one of the Library’s favourite sons, how has the transition from library to screen writer been?

Ben: Libraries are hallowed ground for all writers, cathedrals built for stories, so working in a library was a special privilege. Particularly one with so many wonderful people on the team! And now I’m still just as lucky to be working with another amazing team of enthusiastic and dedicated people. Screenwriting is very different work, but hopefully serves the same essential purpose as library work: to deliver stories into people’s lives.

TTG Library: The series is both very funny and has a lot of heart and is often very poignant, where have you drawn inspiration from?

Ben: Lots of places! The initial spark came from the idea that it has become more and more common for people to have short, sometimes awkward, sometimes poignant interactions with strangers that only last the length of a trip in an Uber or a taxi. So we dreamt up a character who is a bit socially awkward, but works as a driver because he loves talking to people and trying to help them—even though he’s not always that good at it.

TTG Library: You manage to tell amazingly complete narratives in very short periods of time, was that difficult?

Ben: Part of the challenge with digital formats like ABC iview is engaging the audience in a short space of time. Some of it comes from the format: Harry gets life-coaching from his Dad over the phone, picks up his passengers and gets himself into mischief, then fumbles his way through a talk with Wendy, his crush who works at the drive-thru. I’m lucky to have a very talented and diligent team of collaborators in directors Brendon Skinner and Simon Williams, and producer Kirsty Stark—between us we whittle the story down to just what it needs to be. But we’ve only scratched the surface: there is plenty more to Harry’s story that we are just dying to share with everyone—enough to fill a whole television series!

TTG Library: Is it too late to change the spelling to Gūber?

Ben: Sure, why not? Remember how they renamed The Mighty Ducks as Champions? That wasn’t confusing at all.

TTG Library: Obviously the mentoring you received at the TTG Library, primarily from David and Holly, was instrumental to your success, how vital was it?: a) Incredibly vital b) More vital than can be expressed in English c) 100% vital d) All of the above.

Ben: Definitely D.

[Right answer]

TTG Library: What was the experience of seeing your written words turned into images on the screen like?

Ben: Amazing! We were so lucky to have such a fantastic cast. Our lead actor, Brendan Williams, is really what brings Harry and the show to life. He captures the loveable, dorky charm of the character with this textbook comic expressiveness that cracks me up. Ashton Malcolm as Wendy, the equally-gooberish drive-thru attendant, is just perfect. The whole cast is terrific: every episode has beautiful performances by the supporting cast who play the passengers, from a fretting bridal party to a grumpy grandmother, a nervous schoolboy, to a pair of loudmouth rappers. It’s awesome.

TTG Library: Shane “Kenny” Jacobson plays the voice of Harry’s Dad, did he suggest changing the spelling to Gūber?

Ben: If he did, we certainly would have listened to him! Shane is a legend, in comedy and drama, and he really knows his stuff. He understood the character straight away and had some great suggestions when he recorded the lines in the studio with Brendan. It’s a tough ask for an actor to deliver that emotion when he’s just a voice on a phone, but Shane knocked it out of the park. He captures it perfectly: Harry’s Dad is a regular bloke who loves and supports his son more than anything in the world. TTG Library: Thanks.

Ben: Thank you! Congratulations again Ben!

Catch Goober on ABC iview or through http://au.gooberseries.com/ We want to see more so if you love it too let ABC know.

 

MAIDEN ADELAIDE

Your Friendly Neighbourhood Librarian...Ready to ROCK!!!

Your Friendly Neighbourhood Librarian…Ready to ROCK!!!

Heavy Metal Legends Iron Maiden, a band I have loved since the age of 13, hit Adelaide last Thursday as part of their Book of Souls world tour and I had to go.

One of the first of what came to be called the New Wave of British Heavy Metal, Iron Maiden served as inspiration for many metal acts that followed, including Metallica. With a musical style that is almost like classical music that you can lose yourself in, and with lyrical content drawn from history, politics, social issues and literature, they are what I like to call the ‘thinking mans’ metal band. (You know, I once aced a history test by memorising the lyrics to their song Alexander the Great!)

The show opened with the haunting acapella intro of If Eternity Should Fail with the band joining Dickinson on stage in an explosion of pyros and sound. The 15 song set drew heavily from the new album and included the beautiful Tears of a Clown, dedicated to the late Robin Williams. My only disappointment was that the incredible album closer Empire of the Clouds was not included.
Of the “legacy” songs (not “old” according to Dickinson), concert standards The Trooper (about the charge of the Light Brigade in the Crimean War), Fear of the Dark, Iron Maiden, Blood Brothers and Number of the Beast were all included but fan favourites Run to the Hills and Two Minutes to Midnight were dropped. In their place was a lesser known Children of the Damned and Egyptian-inspired Powerslave which was a great surprise and fit well with the theme of Book of Souls. For me however, the highlight of the whole night was the song they chose to close with: Wasted Years. This is my absolute favourite song and one that I never thought to hear played live as it rarely makes it into the set.

Heavy Metal Legends in Action

Heavy Metal Legends in Action

With more energy than most bands half their age, Maiden actually perform on stage with costumes, pyros and a giant ‘Eddie’ (the band mascot).  The show was everything I had hoped for and short of backing off from a couple of high notes, one would never have guessed that singer Bruce Dickinsen was being treated for cancer in his mouth this time last year!

At one point, the singer halted a song to berate a fan who was getting out of control (security would remove him from the arena). Dickinson went on to apologise reminding people that Iron Maiden is about the love of music, not getting wasted, and that a joint love of music made the fans and the band family.

(Now I have to get my hair cut…I promised my mum…)

Not familiar with the work of Iron Maiden? Why not have a listen to one of their many albums, or check out the live DVD from the Final Frontier or Somewhere Back In Time world tours, documentaries on the band and the New Wave of Metal, or read about their almost 40 year history.

Farewell Maggie…

Just before Christmas, Tea Tree Gully Library said farewell to Library Officer Maggie Orr, our longest ever serving staff member.

Maggie was part of our team for the past 26 years and made selections for the Library’s Travel collection.

Here at the library Maggie is known as someone full of sass and wit, always armed with a snappy comeback and quick to ground anyone showing airs or graces.

She is also one super stylish woman, with her quiff of white hair and black-rimmed glasses being her trademarks. So chic! Who ever said librarians were dowdy?

maggie pic

Those were the days – a younger Maggie smiles for the camera

In December 2014, Maggie was formally awarded her 25 years of service certificate, along with fellow Library staffer Grace D’Costa.

Back then she hinted  she was thinking about retirement, but gave no indication when.

Maggie 2

Being presented her certificate for 25 years of service by Library Arts and Culture Manager Helen Kwaka in December 2014

That was, until November 2015 when she finally said ‘That’s it.’ The decision was made. Maggie would call it quits to travel, sleep in and so much more.

In her farewell note (read by Tricia at her goodbye morning tea) Maggie wrote:

‘Well, for the last time I am talking to you as my work colleagues. I sincerely want to thank you all for your friendships over the years. I have really enjoyed my time and the Library, and it is with some sadness that I say farewell.

I am looking forward to a future full of doing all the things that there never seemed to be time to do. I will watch something on TV that goes beyond 10.30 at night! I will refuse to get out of bed before 8.30 in the morning! I will watch ALL of the Tour de France no matter what time it finishes!! I will go to the beach and build sandcastles! Fly the kite that I was given a year ago and even jump in puddles if I want to! I will visit the city as if I were a traveller from far away and do things a tourist would do!

Never having experienced retirement before I am hoping it is everything people say it is, and if not then I will make it everything it should be!

I will not say goodbye, just see you later.’

We will miss you Maggie. Hope you’re having lots of coffee, swims and planning epic holidays.

Trish reading Maggie's farewell note.jpg

Tricia reading Maggie’s farewell note

 

Morning tea

The generous spread….if you squint you can see Florentine slice on the back left – Maggie’s favourite

Maggie Orr

What our staff are reading over summer

The longer days of summer provide the perfect opportunity to give yourself permission to indulge in some relaxing reading time. Many staff members at the library are currently engrossed in some good books and have shared a bit about them.

What Adrienne is reading:

The Magician’s Land by Lev Grossman

The Magician Trilogy by Lev Grossman

The Magician Trilogy by Lev Grossman

The book that I am currently reading is the fantasy The Magician’s land, by American author Lev Grossman.  It is the third book in a trilogy (following The Magicians and The Magician King).  The initial novel focuses on a group of undergraduates attending a university teaching magical pedagogy in upstate New York.  I started reading this series as these novels use themes familiar to readers of the Harry Potter and Narnia books.  However, I soon discovered that Lev Grossman reinterprets them for an adult audience in a more realistic world with which we can identify.  The novels are sometimes dark, but also funny and intriguing.  There are no real heroes and the characters are imperfect.  There is sex, violence, swearing, and the evil character is truly disturbing.  Moreover, the principal character discovers that life, and going out into the real world after study, can be disillusioning.  So, maybe that is why the novels are strangely addictive!

What David is reading:
Fractured Times: Culture and Society in the 20th Century by Eric Hobsbawm

Fractured Times: Culture and Society in the 20th Century by Eric Hobsbawm

Fractured Times: Culture and Society in the 20th Century by Eric Hobsbawm

Together with Australia’s own Peter Stanley, Hobsbawm is my favourite historian to read. Both of them construct historical narratives that combine literary flair with penetrative insights and flawless logic.

I am hoping a copy of Interned: Torrens Island 1914-15, by Peter Monteath, Mandy Paul and Rebecca Martin appears in my Christmas stocking. My original honours thesis was to be on this somewhat dark chapter of South Australian history, however sources were too scarce to justify subject. Since then my erstwhile academic supervisor Associate Professor Peter Monteath, together with Mandy Paul and Rebecca Martin, has found the diaries of some of the camp inmates. Knowing half the story already, I am excited to read what should be a very timely and cautionary tale about how we, as a nation, overreacted to often paranoid accusations of “enemies within” by brutalising and radicalising otherwise loyal citizens.

What Symon is reading:
British Lorries since 1945 by Mike Forbes and David Hayward

British Lorries since 1945 by Mike Forbes and David Hayward

British Lorries since 1945 by Mike Forbes and David Hayward

I read a lot of non-fiction these days and as an avid classic and vintage vehicle fan, this is right up my alley. Because Australia has never had much of a truck manufacturing industry, many of our trucks (especially in the 50s and 60s) were sourced from the UK- so many of those that this book describes can be found on Aussie roads.

What Helen is reading – in picture format…..we can count eight in this big pile…

There are eight books in Helen's pile - do you recognise any of them?

There are eight books in Helen’s pile – do you recognise any of them?

What Penny is reading:
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky 

Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky

A classic piece of literature, written by the great Russian author Dostoyevsky and published in 1866. There’s an immense number of characters and long-winded names but the story progresses quickly. It centres on the poverty-stricken student Raskolnikov, who is living in squalor in St Petersburg. His downtrodden circumstances and lack of lust for life gradually take his mind to dark places and he seeks bloody revenge against those he perceives to be responsible. He murders people to test his hypothesis that some people are naturally capable of such things and are perfectly justified in their means to do so.  Several times throughout the novel, Raskolnikov justifies his actions by comparing himself with Napoleon, believing the murders are OK because they are in pursuit of a higher purpose. I have found it interesting to discover I often feel deeply sympathetic towards Raskolnikov, empathising with his reasons for murder.

What books are YOU reading this summer?

Island Hopping – Easter Island

Each of us has our own “bucket list” of places we want to visit.  The top of Library manager Helen’s was Easter Island.  However, it is the  most remote inhabited island in the world, being over 3000km from Chile (the ‘closest’ mainland) so travelling there takes some planning.

Helen Easter Island statues2Helen says: I had wanted to visit for over twenty years to see the monolithic human carved moai for which the island is famous.  Strangely enough, my desire came from when I started working in a public library, from shelving a book on Easter Island.  I was intrigued by the images of the moai on the cover. The book was borrowed, and I marvelled at the statues, and from then wanted to see them in person. 

When Helen’s partner suggested travelling to South America for a holiday, the deal was if that was the destination, then Easter Island was on the list!

Our first stop in research was the travel section of the Library, borrowing a number of the books on South America to refine our trip.  One suggested catching a bus over the Andes Mountains to Santiago,  the best way to see the Andes up close – in the comfort of a modern two story bus.  This was added to our itinerary.  We also jumped on-line to get great suggestions on accommodation options and read reviews through Trip Advisor

Organising a flight to Easter Island from Santiago is easy, but the downside is the flight is 5 hours and requires an early morning start of 5am.  Despite this, it was truly worth the journey. The Island is inhabited by less than 6000 people and the main economy of the island is tourism.  There is one town Hanga Roa, which is close to the airport – walking distance even! 

???????????????????????????????There is great food to be had on Easter Island,  especially seafood.
In the mornings, you can see the fisherman selling the fish caught that day to the locals, along with locally grown vegetables, fruit and meat.  If your accommodation doesn’t enable you to cook, the restaurants in town are many and varied.  There are a few good patisseries which feature great cakes and doughnuts (filled with dulcha de leche), but they also specialise in empanadas.  These are very popular especially with the locals. 

The primary reason for visiting Easter Island is of course the famous Moai stautues around the island.  Helen explains to tour options: There are a couple of options, you can arrange a tour with local tour companies where you get a flavour for the history, or you can hire a car and visit any site at your own pace.  Bikes are available for hire – but word of warning, if this is your preference ensure the gears can change and you have a basic puncture repair kit as you don’t want to be stuck a long way from the town with walking as your only solution.

Helen Easter Island statuesThe statues themselves are truly a marvel.   The best site to visit for the statues on the whole island is Rano Raraku, where they were carved from the side of the volcano.  At first the site appears as if the statues were left where they had fallen over, or still in the process of being created.  The closer you get the side of the volcano you can see outlines of a variety of statues which were in the process of being created.  Just ensure you have good walking shoes!

It definitely sounds like Easter Island is a great place to visit. If this has sparked interest for you, start your research on Easter Island today!

The amazing travel adventures of our staff

Tea Tree Gully Library staff are definitely globetrotters. At any given time of year, there are always staff travelling and scaling the grobe,  discovering new territory and encountering new cultures.

In 2014,  staff have again travelled widely, including trips to the USA, Africa,  Japan, China and South America, as well as adventures closer to home here in Australia.

We’ve gathered a few of their travel anecdotes and pics here for you to enjoy!

Sonya’s USA Trip

Hp-Theme-Park-the-wizarding-world-of-harry-potter-13691411-600-450Sonya, no rookie when it comes to overseas travel, has visited six of the seven continents on this planet. On a recent US visit she visited The Wizarding World of Harry Potter, open now for four years. She says: I just went to The Wizarding World of Harry Potter! It’s at Universal Studios, Orlando Florida. There’s a miniature sized snow-topped Hogsmeade Village with all the favourite Harry Potter characters. The centrepiece is Hogwarts Castle and inside is a great simulator ride that has you on a roller coaster adventure with Harry, Ron and Hermione. As you roam the village you can have lunch, (a hearty English fare) at the 3 Broomsticks, and tuck in to some yummy butterbeer! Actors roam the streets in robes and perform small skits for visitors.

We have loads of travel books on the US, and also some of the states including Florida. And of course we carry the entire Harry Potter saga by JK Rowling.

Out of Africa – Chris’ amazing experience

From the first world to the third, Chris talks about his unscheduled, yet life changing stop in the African village of Mpumba.

mpumba kidsSitting beside me on the old rickety mini bus late at night was a young local girl and her friend. Eventually I spoke up, and introduced myself. We discussed the usual – of where I had been and where I was going. I could see they were not sure of my ability to continue alone, and so Pamela, the one sitting closest to me asked if I would prefer to stay at their house for the night, and make my way to the hostel in town tomorrow during daylight. Chris took the offer and followed them back through their village to their house. He was introduced to the family, who were tobacco farmers. He continues: After an hour, Pamela returned, she brought out an impressive dinner. She had spent the last hour over a fire cooking away to feed us all. We sat in a circle, sharing this food, and I could not help but smile. I was invited into a home, fed, given a bed and treated as a life long friend and I had only just met them a few hours before on a bus in the middle of Africa. My friendship grew with this family and I stayed and worked with them for many days. Whether it was fetching water, working on the tobacco farms, helping to cook, I was treated as a true brother. They truly shared the pure kindness of a human being.

You can read the full story of Chris’ African family here. Check out our full range of travel books and DVDs on the catalogue, you may find ideas for your next adventure!

Helen and Penny heart Japan

japan generic

Penny first visited Tokyo as a 17-year-old exchange student, and dreamt of returning some time to live and work. Ten years later she realised this dream.

At 27, I quit my job, to live in the Land of the Rising Sun and become an English teacher in primary schools. I lived in the regional city of Takatsuki, located halfway between Osaka and Kyoto, which made it the perfect base for exploring and domestic travel. I travelled to Tokyo, Kyoto and Hiroshima several times, which are all amazing but some of the most interesting places I visited are much less-known.

Naoshima

One of these was the island of Naoshima, located off the coast of Okayama. Naoshima is dotted with contemporary art galleries, built into the hills to soak up ocean and island views. One of the main galleries, Benesse House, consists of four buildings all designed by renowned Japanese architect Tadao Ando. It’s filled with works from artists all over the world, including Andy Warhol, Jackson Pollock and Yayoi Kusama. One of the main pleasures of the island is encountering the large sculptures and artworks outside, whilst taking in the views of Japan’s Inland Sea region. For those who like their art near the sea, I cannot recommend it highly enough.

Shigaraki ceramics

Another highlight for me was Shigaraki, a small town world famous for pottery located in the central Shiga Prefecture. Artisans have been making pottery here since ancient times and the area is rich with locally mined clay. The entire main street was lined with stores selling ceramics and in each store I visited, you could see ceramic artists working on their new designs. I bought 3  hand-crafted ceramic teapots when I was there and they are a nice reminder  of Shigaraki when I drink green tea, my favourite hot beverage.

shinkansen-train-japan-500

Helen adds for prospective Japan tourists; A visit to a cat cafe or a maid cafe is always a highlight! For transport gunzels, travelling by Shinkansen up and the country is a fabulous experience. Ensure you pick-up food from the supermarket before you jump aboard…. And if you are unable to identify it there is no doubt it will be fabulous!

Even though it’s 8000km due north, Japan shares the same timezone as us, so it’s generally jetlag free!

Over on our Facebook we talked about some new Japan resources that had recently come in. If you’ve been to Japan head over to that post and add what you recommend to see. Also, if you’re planning a trip, we have the most recent Lonely Planet and Eyewitness guides as well as a huge range of other Japan highlights books.

Tricia’s trip to China

Tricia talks about her travels through China. The land of the ‘unexpected’ – a vast and complex country with many layers of culture, political upheaval and history and amazing contrasts of ultra modern mega cities and beautiful idyllic wilderness.

Visiting China for 3 weeks only scratches the surface of this nation of friendly and inquisitive people we gave it our best shot visiting of the most well-known sites.

china2

First stop was the walled city of Xian. Xian typifies China with its mix of ancient architecture, culture and antiquities contrasting with the modern business and hotel districts. Followed by Beijing, including the Olympic village and a number of amazing cultural shows combining Chinese acrobatics, humour and culture with wonderful banquets. Treasures such as the Terracotta Warriors, The Great Wall of China, The Forbidden City, Tai Chi in the park, the Winter Palace and so much more were explored and climbed and photographed! Our Library travel guide was invaluable for locating many of these sites.She recites a hilarious misunderstanding on her last day:

Our guide in China was a lovely, friendly man called Sandy ( his western name) who promised to give us a special present at the end.

What could we give him in return that wasn’t the usual kangaroo or koala made in China? I decided we should give Sandy my tube of Vegemite which, I have to travel with no matter how far that may be. It was a sacrifice I was prepared to make to ensure our gift was of a comparable nature and cultural significance to the one he’d no doubt provide us.

Sandi was gracious in his acceptance and promptly proceeded to smear it all over his arms, face and neck. “It’s a sunscreen right?”

China 1

If we had to choose just one adjective to describe our China adventure I think it would be unexpected. Unexpectedly easy to travel within, organised, beautiful, charming, contrasting and comfortable. The people are friendly, knowledgeable, more open than we expected in discussing Chinese politics and we felt very lucky and privileged to have had even this small trip to such a great destination.

The Library has a range of travel guides for China, from basic overviews, to guide on Beijing, Shanghai and Xian specifically. We also have heaps of DVDs on this region too!

Ticking Easter Island off the Bucket List

Easter Island has been at the top of Library manager Helen’s travel list for years . However, as the most remote inhabited island in the world, located some  3000km from Chile (the ‘closest’ mainland) travelling there takes some planning.

Helen Easter Island statues2Helen says: I had wanted to visit for over twenty years to see the monolithic human carved moai for which the island is famous. Strangely enough, my desire came from when I started working in a public library, from shelving a book on Easter Island. I was intrigued by the images of the moai on the cover. The book was borrowed, and I marvelled at the statues, and from then wanted to see them in person.

When Helen’s partner suggested travelling to South America for a holiday, the deal was if that was the destination, then Easter Island was on the list!

Our first stop in research was the travel section of the Library, borrowing a number of the books on South America to refine our trip. One suggested catching a bus over the Andes Mountains to Santiago, the best way to see the Andes up close – in the comfort of a modern two story bus. This was added to our itinerary. We also jumped on-line to get great suggestions on accommodation options and read reviews through Trip Advisor

Organising a flight to Easter Island from Santiago is easy, but the downside is the flight is 5 hours and requires an early morning start of 5am. Despite this, it was truly worth the journey. The Island is inhabited by less than 6000 people and the main economy of the island is tourism. There is one town Hanga Roa, which is close to the airport – walking distance even!

???????????????????????????????There is great food to be had on Easter Island, especially seafood.
In the mornings, you can see the fisherman selling the fish caught that day to the locals, along with locally grown vegetables, fruit and meat. If your accommodation doesn’t enable you to cook, the restaurants in town are many and varied. There are a few good patisseries which feature great cakes and doughnuts (filled with dulcha de leche), but they also specialise in empanadas. These are very popular, especially with the locals.

The primary reason for visiting Easter Island is of course the famous Moai stautues around the island. Helen explains to tour options: There are a couple of options, you can arrange a tour with local tour companies where you get a flavour for the history, or you can hire a car and visit any site at your own pace. Bikes are available for hire – but word of warning, if this is your preference ensure the gears can change and you have a basic puncture repair kit as you don’t want to be stuck a long way from the town with walking as your only solution.

Helen Easter Island statuesThe statues themselves are truly a marvel. The best site to visit for the statues on the whole island is Rano Raraku, where they were carved from the side of the volcano. At first the site appears as if the statues were left where they had fallen over, or still in the process of being created. The closer you get the side of the volcano you can see outlines of a variety of statues which were in the process of being created. Just ensure you have good walking shoes!

It definitely sounds like Easter Island is a great place to visit. If this has sparked interest for you, start your research on Easter Island today!

Kathy’s Outback Aussie Adventure

This year Kathy had an adventure little closer to home.

A quiet falt campsite a little way from the dustbowl the main camping ground became

An avid 4WD adventurer, Kathy and her family recently returned from far west Queensland where they attended the Big Red Bash, an outback concert on the largest sand dune in the Simpson Desert. Not for the faint-hearted, a trip to Big Red requires some hefty 4 wheel drive work after a less-than-leisurely 1500km trek north from Adelaide to Birdsville.

As they say, the journey is half the fun with stop-overs in remote and character filled locales like Leigh Creek, Maree, Clayton Station and Mungerannie Pub along the way.

big red attempt

After finding the perfect campsite at Big Red, a 4WD adventure isn’t complete without actually driving up the dunes! After some Pajero practice out in the desert, Kathy’s daughter Stacey tackled the big one with a successful ascent on her first attempt!

Starting just after dinner, the outback concert carried on over two nights featuring classic Aussie rockers, Darryl Braithwaite, James Reyne and Ross Wilson.

big red concert

It’s not a 4WD adventure without the obligatory breakage of something, this time a starter motor problem ensured Kathy and family had a legitimate excuse to stay in the bush for a couple of extra days!

big red - susnset at Birdsville

The Library has an extensive range of 4WD and Australian adventure resources, so come see us (and Kathy!) if you’re planning an outback Australia journey.

How Tea Tree Gully Library inspired our barista’s latest tattoo

Eventually, Liz Warner’s body will read like a story time book.

Liz Warner, Manager of the Topiary Pantry, as you normally see her...

Liz Warner, Manager of the Topiary Pantry, next to the Library.

We were delighted to discover that one of the books from the Library’s collection had inspired the latest tattoo for Liz, our beloved barista from the Library cafe The Topiary Pantry.

Liz was all smiles as she proudly showed us her new and beautiful tattoo of Disney Princess Snow White, which is an exact copy of an image from the art book ‘The Art of the Disney Princess’.  The book was recommended to her by Local History Officer David Brooks during a chat one day while she was making his coffee – he knows Liz loves fairy tales!

Liz and the book.

Liz and the book!

Straight from the book: a darker side to Snow White....

A darker side to Snow White …

Like so many others, Liz has fallen in love with tattoo art, and so taken was she with the Snow White image from the book, that within a week she’d been into Modbury tattoo parlour, Aussie Ink, to acquire the tattoo.

There, the tattoo artist made a copy of the Snow White image from the book and then successfully inked the image onto Liz’s right thigh. Check it out:

Here it is. Wow.

Here it is. The book, and Liz’s tattoo. Wow.

The Adelaide Tattoo Show starts today, Friday 2 May and runs all weekend at the Adelaide Conference Centre, so it seemed timely to have a quick chat with Liz and find out a bit more about the story behind her tattoo!

Why did you get a tattoo?

‘Tattoos are just something that happens, really. The first tattoo I ever got was of the Cheshire Cat, which is a reminder that it’s OK to be a bit crazy – and everyone is a little crazy.’

Why Snow White?

‘She was the first Disney Princess, so pure and innocent and to me she represents that temptation of innocence. I do like the darker twists behind fairytales, in that they’re not always as wholesome as they seem.

‘David gave me the book ‘The Art of the Disney Princess’ one day while he was waiting for his coffee, because he knows I love fairytales and thought I might like to read it, but I ended up taking the book to a tattoo artist instead!’

Does it hurt to get a tattoo?

‘No, I’d describe it as an annoying, scratchy feeling, but I do think everyone feels pain differently.’

Will you get more tattoos?

‘I’ve since got another tattoo, this time on my left thigh, of Little Red Riding Hood. My partner is really impressed, and even though he has a cold, he is in fact getting his first ever tattoo today!

Wow. Do you think he might also be inspired by one of the books in our collection, for his tattoo?

‘He said he was pretty sure he had a library card somewhere, so he’s keen to come and check out the books at the library to see if he finds something!’

The inspiration: 'The Art of the Disney Princesses'

The inspiration: ‘The Art of the Disney Princesses’