3 minutes of poetic fame

new-inc

The Writes of Spring

Open mic poetry readings at the Library

11800067 - microphone and swirling text

Wednesday 28 September 2016

6.30 – 7.30pm (spectators) 6.00 – 7.30pm (performers)

North Eastern Writers Inc. will be presenting a free evening of poetry at the Library ‘The Writes of Spring’ on Wednesday 28 September 2016.

Come along to the Relaxed Reading Area of the Library and hear a range of emotive poetry and prose readings from members of the North Eastern Writers and the general public.

Or if you are a budding poet why not perform your piece? It costs $5 to participate and there is a three minute limit for each performer.  Registration is from 6pm.  Bare your soul, make a social comment, make us laugh or rap.  Whatever your style of poetry, you will be welcome.

A wine and cheese supper will be served.  Book online or telephone the Library on      8397 7333.

 

 

 

 

Climate change can be deadly

David Kilner for blog

Adelaide author David Kilner has been writing crime stories for several years. He will be visiting the Library this month to speak about his first novel The Climate Change Murders and about lots of things ‘literary’.

When: Wednesday 27 July, 6.30pm – 7.30pm.

Venue: Relaxed Reading Area, City of Tea Tree Gully Library.

Cost: Free.  Bookings are essential.

“In this light-hearted talk, David Kilner will discuss crime fiction in its many forms, from its origins 250 years ago, through the years to contemporary fiction. Along the way he’ll look at the impact of film and television on crime writing and ask what does reading or watching crime fiction actually do for us?  Finally he’ll talk about his own books – how they came to be written, some of the challenges of writing and why he chose his characters.”  http://www.davidkilner.com

In The Climate Change Murders you can meet the new cop on the beat, Detective Sergeant Skyla Merrick.  Like all good fictional detectives, Skyla has a troubled past with a bad romance that she would rather forget about.   But of course, those experiences never really go away for our heroine.

“Somebody wanted Edwina Ling dead and it would not be a pleasant death, that was for sure. But who was the villain? The climate change activist? The professional colleague? The fishing industry guru? The ex-lover? The disgruntled employee? Detective Sergeant Skyla Merrick must tackle not only confusing evidence trails and public brawls but also long-buried personal traumas that threaten her objectivity. The only one she can turn to for help is the man who betrayed her.”  http://www.davidkilner.com

David says that he especially loves the British school of crime writing, as these authors explore why criminals act, their psycology and motivation, rather than just ‘whodunnit’.  He especially admires the work of PD James, Ian Rankin, Elizabeth George and Ruth Rendell/Barbara Vine.

The Climate Change Murders could be your next good read.  If you would like to come along to meet David, you can book online or telephone: 8397 7333.  A wine and cheese supper will be served. Copies of The Climate Change Murders will be available for sale and signing by the author.

 

 

Book launch

 Book cover 7

‘Erteisia: Ultimate Sacrifice’ by Linda Lofts Wiles

Linda Lofts Wiles will launch the first novel of her new science fiction trilogy ‘Ertesia: Ultimate Sacrifice’ at this special event.

 When:  6.30 – 7.30pm, Wednesday 29 June.

Venue:  Relaxed Reading Area, City of Tea Tree Gully Library.

Cost:  Free.   Bookings are essential.

Copies of ‘Erteisia: Ultimate Sacrifice’ will be available for sale and signing by the author. A wine and cheese supper will be served.

About ‘Erteisia: Ultimate Sacrifice’:

T’Ertesia: Ultimate Sacrifice’ is set in a time of war, where humanity struggles against the dominion of an evil tyrant and eventual extermination.

The people of a distant planet Utopia, seek to intervene by sending Sianna’Q, a newly ordained warrior to Earth. She will journey through time and experience the wonders of space, meeting amazing and unique creatures such as the Time Maestro – the keeper of all that is known and forgotten.

Book online, at the Library or by telephone: 8397 7333.

 

Foraging for wild mushrooms

On Saturday 14 May, the library hosted a Mushroom Foraging excursion with Adelaide horticulturalist Kate Grigg.

We took a group of 15 guests to Pine Park in Tea Tree Gully and then onto South Australian state forest near Mount Crawford. It wasn’t long before we had collected a decent amount of mushrooms, garlic and other edible flowers & greens.

Our guide Kate has been a forager of wild mushrooms for over 18 years in South Australia, particularly in the Adelaide Hills region. She’s passionate about teaching others about many of the edible goods that lie in our native bushland and pine forests, including mushrooms but also native greens, flowers and berries. Like anything, it’s about knowing what you need to look for.

Edible flowers in Tea Tree Gully

Who knew these pretty pink flowers are edible – we ate all of the ones we found in Pine Park, in Tea Tree Gully

A few things Kate taught us about spotting edible wild mushrooms:

  • Don’t eat any mushroom with white spores (the part underneath the top of the mushroom). If in doubt – leave it out.
  • Cut the stems off any edible mushrooms you find. Then put them back under the pine needles, to help the next flush of mushrooms bloom.
  • Don’t eat raw mushrooms – they are harder to digest. It is always best to cook any wild mushrooms you find. The heat will break down any mild toxins in wild mushrooms.
  • Avoid all umbrella shaped mushrooms – these are the deadly ones. They often have lovely and iridescent colouring, but don’t be fooled. Take photos, but please please please don’t eat them.
IMG_5310.jpg

Horticulturalist Kate Grigg, expert mushroom guide.

IMG_5346

On the hunt for goodies, in state forest near Mt Crawford.

The most common kind of mushrooms we came across were saffron milk caps and slippery jacks,  which are the normal sort found in Australian pine forests.

IMG_5348

Some of our finds on the foraging trip – dock leaves, ginger, pine mushrooms, saffron milk cap and Slippery Jack mushrooms.

 

Many colourful and magical mushrooms were also spotted – but Kate was quick to point out these are often poisonous and absolutely inedible.

 

The weather was perfect and it seemed the more mushrooms we found, the more we continued to find. We discovered an edible feast spread over the pine forest floor.

After lots of gathering and walking, we cooked our wild mushrooms in olive oil and in some of the garlic we found in Pine Park.

Paired with some sourdough bread, our mushrooms proved to be a delicious morning tea on a misty autumn day.

Go behind the scenes at the Library

Megan Behind the Scenes tour

Have you ever wondered where library staff go when they tell you they need to search “out the back”?   Or thought about how everything you borrow mysteriously gets labels on the covers and put onto the Library’s computer system?

Come on the Library’s Behind the scenes tour to find out the answers to these questions and others that you may have.  You will certainly be surprised!

Date and time:   Thursday 26 May,11am – noon

Cost:  Free. Bookings are essential.  Places are limited.  Tours start at the Ask Here Desk. 

  • Follow the life of a book from purchase to debit.
  • See how a book gets from the supplier to the shelf.
  • Learn about some of the backroom tasks that library staff perform.
  • Discover what happen when you return at item in the chute. 
  • Gain a greater awareness of the volume of resources available for use.

Book online or telephone 8397 7333.

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day!

Leprechaun 12426480_ml

The Irish ‘craic’ is a specific and quintessential Irish form of fun.

It can mean fun and enjoyment, general banter or a joke.  ‘Craic’ implies that a good time will be had by all and it often involves music and alcohol. ‘Craic’ also refers to a person who is good fun and great company.

The Library’s St. Patrick’s event can surely cater to all of the above interpretations of ‘craic’. So on the eve of St. Pat’s day, join us for a celebration of all things Irish, with humorous poet Jill Wherry (a craic if ever there was one), Irish music and dance.

Jilly Wherry

Jilly Wherry

When: Wednesday 16 March, 6.30pm – 7.30pm.

Venue:  Relaxed Reading Area, City of Tea Tree Gully Library.

 Cost: Free. Bookings are essential.

Wine and a light supper will be supplied.

With so much Irish cheer, it would not be surprising if the beer turned green!

Book online or telephone the Library.

Free Hearing Checks Friday 20 November

Get your hearing checked for free in just 15 minutes.

Australian Hearing will be at Tea Tree Gully Library on Friday 20 November 10am-1pm.

A hearing check is painless, unobtrusive and measures what sounds you can and cannot hear. Getting your hearing checked is a simple way to learn more about your hearing and what can be done to help.

Phone 8397 7333 to make a booking.