Way back when, Wednesdays

women at TTPOn face value

On page 18 of the edition dated 1 August,1973, The Leader Messenger interviewed two women for their feature ‘Tea Tree Plaza news’. Fay McGilvray was in charge of three departments at Myer and Paula Darby was employed as the Promotions Coordinator at Tea Tree Plaza.

The article was entitled ‘Attractive women who work at TTP’. Reading this title might give you a chuckle but then you would cringe and reflect on the sexism of the past. Were these ladies considered attractive just because of their physical appearance, because they were successful, or was it a combination of both? How did the Messenger Press select the women featured? Did they approach Centre Management at Tea Tree Plaza to ask if any female employees were interested in taking part or just walk around the shops looking for potential ‘talent’?

In 1973 the Women’s Movement was active in Australia. Internationally, large numbers of women campaigned for change and an end to discrimination. Some women strove to get an education and forge a career, when the workplace was still dominated by men in senior roles. Women were paid a lot less than men. Many women became homemakers once they married and had a child. Germaine Greer’s monumental book ‘The Female Eunuch’, which was published in 1970, encouraged women to embrace their sexuality and to not hate themselves. But this is different to being portrayed as a sex object. One of my colleagues once remarked that in the 70s sexism was rife “You were just a piece of meat at work.” Note that both Fay and Paula were photographed in poses which we could describe as alluring. They are not standing tall and proud.

Whatever the intention of the journalist, in modern times you would not usually read about women in business described as attractive. Nevertheless, based on the experience of another of our staff members who has worked as a newspaper journalist in Queensland, the media is still focused on appearance, because that is supposedly what readers want. Newspaper picture editors were invariably male and they would only select photographs of attractive girls and women for publication.

We still have much to achieve.

 

#waybackwhenwednesdays

Farewell Maggie…

Just before Christmas, Tea Tree Gully Library said farewell to Library Officer Maggie Orr, our longest ever serving staff member.

Maggie was part of our team for the past 26 years and made selections for the Library’s Travel collection.

Here at the library Maggie is known as someone full of sass and wit, always armed with a snappy comeback and quick to ground anyone showing airs or graces.

She is also one super stylish woman, with her quiff of white hair and black-rimmed glasses being her trademarks. So chic! Who ever said librarians were dowdy?

maggie pic

Those were the days – a younger Maggie smiles for the camera

In December 2014, Maggie was formally awarded her 25 years of service certificate, along with fellow Library staffer Grace D’Costa.

Back then she hinted  she was thinking about retirement, but gave no indication when.

Maggie 2

Being presented her certificate for 25 years of service by Library Arts and Culture Manager Helen Kwaka in December 2014

That was, until November 2015 when she finally said ‘That’s it.’ The decision was made. Maggie would call it quits to travel, sleep in and so much more.

In her farewell note (read by Tricia at her goodbye morning tea) Maggie wrote:

‘Well, for the last time I am talking to you as my work colleagues. I sincerely want to thank you all for your friendships over the years. I have really enjoyed my time and the Library, and it is with some sadness that I say farewell.

I am looking forward to a future full of doing all the things that there never seemed to be time to do. I will watch something on TV that goes beyond 10.30 at night! I will refuse to get out of bed before 8.30 in the morning! I will watch ALL of the Tour de France no matter what time it finishes!! I will go to the beach and build sandcastles! Fly the kite that I was given a year ago and even jump in puddles if I want to! I will visit the city as if I were a traveller from far away and do things a tourist would do!

Never having experienced retirement before I am hoping it is everything people say it is, and if not then I will make it everything it should be!

I will not say goodbye, just see you later.’

We will miss you Maggie. Hope you’re having lots of coffee, swims and planning epic holidays.

Trish reading Maggie's farewell note.jpg

Tricia reading Maggie’s farewell note

 

Morning tea

The generous spread….if you squint you can see Florentine slice on the back left – Maggie’s favourite

Maggie Orr

Author Event – Wed 14 October, 6.30pm

Join author Maureen Mitson for this special event, where she will launch her first full-length novel Beatrice’s Commonsensical Approach, a story focusing on SA’s pioneering female political activist Mary Lee.

A delicious wine and cheese supper will be provided.

Bookings are essential. Please phone 8397 7333 or book online

Scandinavian stitching

Are you addicted to watching Nordic Noir?  A fan of Scandinavian crime drama such as The Killing, The Bridge, Wallander, The Eagle, Unit One or Anna Pihl?  In which the northern weather always seems to be bleak, dark and cold to match the melancholy of the setting?  Remember, our winter is coming and soon we too will feel the chill of bitter winds.  While you sitting immersed in these crime DVDs, why not prepare for the cooler weather by making something warm?  Or just try out some Nordic themed needlecrafts? You can reserve all of these titles through the One Card Network online catalogue, or enquire next time you visit the Library.

Nordic knitting traditionsNordic Knitting Traditions, 25 Scandinavian, Icelandic and Fair Isle Accessories. By Susan Anderson-Freed.

Knit hats, gloves, mittens, socks and leg warmers.

 

 

Quick Icelandic Knits

Quick Icelandic Knits.  Sweaters, Hats, Socks, Mittens and more.  By Gun Birgirsdottir.  Lots of woolly jumpers!

Includes instructions for felted hats, childrens’ slippers and bags.

 

 

Strikketoj

Strikketoj.  Knitting Designs inspired by the Pop Culture of the 20th Century.  By Helga Isager.

Helga Isager interprets fashion trends from 1900 to 1990  in fresh contemporary designs.

 

 

 

Knitting Scandinavian Slippers and Socks

 

Knitting Scandinavian Slippers and Socks.  By Laura Farson.

 

 

 

 

Baby knitsBaby knits from around the world : 20 heirloom projects in a variety of styles and techniques.  Edited by Kari Cornell.

Knitting patterns for infant’s clothing from around the world, including knits of Scandinavia.

 

Swedish knitsSwedish knits : classic and modern designs in the Scandinavian tradition.  Written by Paula Hammerskog and Eva Wincent ; photos by Rikard Westman.

 

 

 

Nordic crafts Nordic crafts : over 30 projects inspired by Scandinavian            style.  By Mia Underwood.

 

 

 

Northern Knits Northern Knits : designs inspired by the knitting traditions of Scandinavia, Iceland, and the Shetland Isles.   By Lucinda Guy.

 

 

 

Scandinavian needlecraftScandinavian needlecraft : 35 step-by-step projects to create the Scandinavian home.

Make some lovely things with simple elegant motifs, such as the felt bag on the cover.

 

Knitting in the Nordic TraditionKnitting in the Nordic tradition.  By Vibeke Lind.  English translation by Annette Allen Jensen.

 

 

 

150 Scandinavian knitting designs150 Scandinavian knitting designs.  By Mary Jane Mucklestone.

Authentic designs with acual-size swatches, charts and alternative colourways.

 

Norwegian Knits with a Twist Norwegian knits with a twist.  Socks, Sweaters, Mittens, Hats, Pillows, Blankets and a Whole Lot More.  By Arne & Carlos.

Traditional embroidery, tapestry, and knitting motifs from Setesdal, in the south of Norway, are brilliantly re-conceived in this fabulously fresh collection of knitting projects from Arne and Carlos.

 

Crochet Scandinavian StyleCrochet : Scandinavian style.  By Eva Wincent & Paula Hammerskog.

Scandinavian designs in red and white : craft and sew 55 beautiful projects for the home.  By Nadja Knab-Leers, Heike Roland, Stefanie Thomas.

 

 

The Killing HandbookThe Killing Handbook : Forbrydelsen forever!  By Emma Kennedy [foreword by Sofie Grabol].

Includes a knitting pattern for the Faroe Islands jumper worn by detective Sarah Lund in the Danish television series The Killing.

 

 

Everyone ought to live like a Parisian. Apparently.

A suite of lifestyle guides based on the lives of Parisians have been published over the years. On bookshop and library shelves you may have seen titles such as French Women Don’t Get Fat, French Women Don’t Get Facelifts, French Women for All Seasons,  French Children Don’t Throw Food and the recently published, How To Be Parisian Wherever You are.

French women don't get fat

The book that started the ‘French women do it better’ genre….Mireille Guiliano’s French Women Don’t Get Fat

All the books aim to sell a certain idea of the Frenchwoman to we the less sophisticated foreigners. From start to finish, pages are filled with illustrations, photographs, lists, recipes, how-to’s and plenty of no-nonsense advice for improving your life by adopting Parisian ways and customs.

The latest offering, How to be Parisian Wherever You Are, is written by four accomplished French women, who have set out to explain “the art of beauty —the Parisian way.”

Their advice includes:

‘Smoke like a chimney on the way to the countryside to get some fresh air.’

‘Don’t feel guilty about infidelity.’

‘Cheat on your lover with your boyfriend.’

How to be Parisian wherever you are

Take some notes when you read How to be Parisian Wherever You Are…or don’t.

Still, you have to wonder – how many actual Parisians resemble these stereotypes in real life? UK Guardian journalist Hadley Freeman once lived in Paris and believes there is no such thing.

She recently wrote on this very topic: ‘…the funny thing is, in all my life of being related to Parisians, visiting Parisians and eating baguettes with Parisians on their scooters, I have never once come across a single woman who fits the stereotype peddled by these books. These idiotic guides present an image that is about as representative of Parisians as Four Weddings and a Funeral is of the average Brit.’

Whether or not real Parisian women truly fit the stereotypes by always looking chic, having lovers, eating baguettes and staying thin, the books are beautifully laid out, compact (most will fit in your handbag) and present stunning images of French life. They will certainly provide inspiration and give you a chuckle or two.

You can borrow any of the above mentioned books from our library catalogue. ‘How to be Parisian Wherever You Are’ was released in late 2014 and is available to borrow here