Dyslexia Friendly Collection

The more you read, the easier it becomes. But for those who struggle with words, reading is not always fun, and it’s easy to lose heart and stop trying.

Tea Tree Gully Library has recently made it easier to find dyslexia-friendly books and audiobooks by putting them in their own space  in the children’s and teen areas. They now have signage and coloured labels so they are easy to find.

To search for dyslexia friendly books, type in ‘dyslexia’ in the catalogue, just like below, and from there you can select the ‘dyslexia’ boxes on the left-hand side.

dyslexia friendly

Dyslexia primarily affects the ability to learn, read and spell. Sometimes maths is affected as well.  It’s important to remember that having dyslexia is not related to someone’s general intelligence. It comes from a difficulty in dealing with the sounds of words. People with dyslexia often find it hard to remember lists of things they have heard, or to remember names or facts quickly, although they often have strengths in reasoning, visual and creative fields.

Features of Dyslexia Friendly Books:

  • A font style and size that is clear to read.
  • Off-white paper that is kinder to the eyes as it reduces glare from the high contrast of black against white.
  • Spacing between letters, lines and paragraphs
  • Age appropriate content and story lines but with less text to a page and more pictures
  • Shorter chapters to give the eyes natural ‘rest’ breaks

Where are they located?

Children’s Area: Find them in the area near the book series boxes.

DXf-C

Book stickers on Dyslexia Friendly Collection (DXF-C) in the children’s area of Tea Tree Gully Library

DXFC

You can find dyslexia friendly books and audio books among the Children’s book series boxes in the Children’s Area.

Teens Area: You can find them on the last shelf facing the public computers.

Stickers on the Dyslexia Friendly Books in the Teen Area

Stickers on the Dyslexia Friendly Books in the Teen Area

Find the DXF-T books in the shelf that faces the computers (in the Teen Area).

Find the DXF-T books in the shelf that faces the computers (in the Teen Area).

We hope our new collections appeal to children and young people who have dyslexia or who are reluctant to read. May they inspire a new love of reading!

Why reading to your preschooler is important.

Literacy is a vital skill in our society yet it is a struggle for many children and adults. Reading with your children from birth gives them the best start for their brain development, early language and literacy skills.

Preschooler reading

Parents who regularly read to their preschool aged children are laying the foundations for significant cognitive and learning benefits in their child for schooling and education.

Many studies have shown that reading to children before they start school makes a significant difference in how well they learn at school, protects them from later reading problems, supports their vocabulary and cognitive development, and facilitates bonds between adults and children.

 
Parental reading to children at age 4 to 5 has positive and significant effects on reading skills and the cognitive skills of children aged at least up to age 10 or 11. So a small investment of 3 books a day now can make a big different for many years!
But what books should you read to your child?

 
Preschoolers love books that have humour, adventure and characters they relate to. Your preschooler is growing up and stories will help them understand new experiences and feelings. Be guided by their interests. Stories or factual books are all valid reading material. Books are a great way to discover the world. All children love predictable books, books that have a pattern, a predictable plot and lots of repetition.

Preschoolers playing

Preschoolers love patterns, rhythms and predictability.

When you read to your child, run your finger under the words from time to time as you read them. This will teach them that you read from top to bottom and left to right.

What do preschoolers need to know to help them learn to read?
Early literacy skills include:

  • Being able to recognise and name letters of the alphabet.
  • General knowledge about print, for example, which is the front of the book and which is the back, how to turn pages of the book.
  • The ability to identify and manipulate sounds.

Parents may also stimulate reading by their children through

  • buying children’s books
  • taking them to public libraries
  • talking about reading through the day and in everything you do
  • giving the example of reading yourself.

Some tips for when you are reading aloud:

  • Think about the words the author has chosen, and the rhythm, repetition or fun they have built into the story. Try to emphasise those elements.
  • Sound words – make them ‘sound like the sound’ so “clickety-clack” is sharp and short, emphasising the consonants, or ‘whoooosh’ is a long dynamic word.
  • Take your time, ensure each word is separated and easy to understand. Compared to when a child hears a song and learns the rhythm but can’t always distinguish each word, a child being read to should be able to hear each word in the story.
  • Follow cues from the words ie ‘up’ or ‘down’, ‘quiet’ or ‘loud’. Have your voice do the same.
  • Have fun and enjoy the special time with your child!

 

More online resources:

Reading to Young Children: A Head-Start in Life? Guyonne Kalb and Jan C. von Ours, Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series, Working Paper No. 17/13, 2013

http://www.better-beginnings.com.au/research/research-about-literacy-and-reading#Families as First Teachers

http://www.thelittlebigbookclub.com.au/ages-and-stages/preschoolers

http://www.thelittlebigbookclub.com.au/news/2011/reading-with-preschoolers

www.letsread.com.au/About/Why-Is-Reading-Important

Our new Disability Friendly Collection is here

Scrabble large printIn response to community need we have developed a disability friendly collection. This collection is available for all of our customers to use. All items within the collection are available for loan, and some items can even be used in the library.

 

 

Collection items you can borrow and try at home include:

  • Deluxe Scrabble board
  • Large print dominos
  • Braille Uno and Large Print playing cards
  • Large Print Songbooks
  • Listen and Play Music Lessons DVD
  • Bingo support set and Rummikub
  • Daisy Player device for use with our spoken word    collection or download from the Vision Australia     catalogue
  • Navigator device for use with the downloadable RSB
    catalogue
  • Booksense Audio Multiplayer device

The Library partnerships team can provided one on one support for some of these devices. To arrange a time please contact a member of the Partnerships team on 8397 7456. All devices come with full instructions.

 

The Summer Reading Club ‘The Amazing Read’ Finale


Fifty-five children participated in the Summer Reading Club, reading at least ten books each. Some have read significantly more than that, with a combined total of over 1000 books read so far.

 

One girl has even created her own charity fundraiser reading project after being inspired by the program.

Forty-one attended the finale with their parents, with activities including making marshmallow snowmen, alfoil sculptures, races with cotton wool stuck to their noses with Vaseline, badgemaking, face painting and Splash Theatre’s Mr Badger telling stories from Wind in the Willows.

We gave out lots of prizes for best book review, best costume and raffle draws. Staff enjoyed dressing up as much as the children but the winner was our Little Emperor.

It was a great night, which the children and parents really enjoyed and appreciated.

Reading to man’s best friend

For children who have reading or learning difficulties, the idea of reading aloud to an adult can be intimidating, which I think is fair enough. What if you get the words wrong, or you miss a page?

 So as a promoter of literacy skills, and a big fan of dogs, I love the idea of the programs in Australia and overseas, where school children read aloud to dogs, to help them gain confidence and a love of books. 

Ask your child to read to their pet, and let us know how they go!