Anirban’s work experience at Tea Tree Gully Library

 

Anirban recently completed a two-week work experience placement at Tea Tree Gully Library. Here is his account of his time:

I am a people person. I enjoy talking with patrons and I enjoy dealing with a diverse range of people from different backgrounds and ethnicities. I enjoy giving direct support to senior management, colleagues and co-workers in a way that really makes a noticeable difference. I enjoy challenges, responsibilities, methodical as well as precise approach.

My placement at Tea Tree Gully Library has provided me with an excellent opportunity to develop professional networks with colleagues and library staff members. Over the past two weeks, staff have become familiar with my professional ability, punctuality, reliability, team skills and work ethics. I believe these connections will provide strong references in the future when the time comes to gain meaningful and sustainable employment in the library industry.

Working at the Library has given me a chance to observe how other employees operate and behave in various circumstances. For instance, verbal and non-verbal communication, writing clear business correspondence, observing office etiquette and behaviour patterns, answering telephone calls, dealing with difficult and aggressive patrons and resolving conflicts.

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This placement has been an opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge I have learned at TAFE in a professional environment. Applying skills practically has helped me to identify my biggest strengths and areas I can improve in the future. My workplace supervisors have given me the necessary training and induction during my placement. Customer service attendants and other specialist library staff have helped me to complete my work placement through various on-the-job training.

For instance, a WHS representative Stephen Radlett gave me the necessary training for manual handling. The Digital Hub coordinator, Julian Smith, explained vividly how to use various electronic devices for placing a hold, searching the library catalogue and how to use social media platforms for collaboration, communication and effective engagement with peers, colleagues and patrons. Overall, the preparation was insightful and equally comprehensive.

My placement has allowed me to work in different areas in the Library to see what environment suits me most. For example, dealing with children, computers and systems, collections, adult programs and community history. It is practically impossible to know where I will best fit without trying a variety of responsibilities. Moreover, the library has a wide range of patrons and staff from different cultures, ethnicities and educational backgrounds. That has made the internship even more vibrant, stimulating and insightful.

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Placements usually award me with some kind of compensation such as course credit or a professional recommendation. With the Tea Tree Gully Library, I have greatly admired their support, constant cooperation and desire for professional growth in their employees. I was privileged to be able to take advantage of in-house training and flexible scheduling to complete my Certificate IV in Library and Information Services.

The entire purpose of a placement is to gain new skills and apply them to real tasks. For example, during the placement I have learnt the different uses and functionalities of the SirsiDynix Library Management system, how to display an educational event and project management techniques. A placement is like a crash course of working in the real world. I am learning from hands-on experience instead of a classroom-based lesson. Whether it learning big things or little things, I have been learning constantly. In the real world of employment, learning never stops, so it has been great to start adding to my skill set while undertaking my placement as a trainee library assistant.

It is difficult to find a placement in the library industry under the current economic and political climate, especially in South Australia. Placements are all about gaining experience, making professional connections and learning new skills. They involve a lot of work, learning, observation, and involvement.  Whether it is the work I am doing or the people that surround me, there are so many different things to love about my placements.

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The successful completion of a college certificate does not necessarily provide direct entry into a career. I think of placements as career experiments to accomplish long-term educational and career objectives. I have enjoyed my placement and wish to work in the Library industry upon graduation.

Doing something I love and thoroughly enjoy is vitally important because it resembles what I want to do in the future. I felt like I hit the jackpot when I got my approval letter to complete a placement at the Tea Tree Gully Library. I have thoroughly enjoyed it.

A placement may often be perceived as an audition for a full-time job either with the same organisation or with a different organisation. My advice for future work experience students is to apply yourself to a placement as if it is a permanent engagement, or if it might turn into one. Libraries are always looking for dedicated, passionate, dynamic, and creative individuals. It is worth remembering that hard work always pays off!

Stepping out of your comfort zone

Work experience student Holly recently spent one week with us at Tea Tree Gully Library. Not only did she learn about the library and all of the work that goes on behind the scenes, she also learned a lot about herself.

‘Hi, my name is Holly and I attended work experience at the Tea Tree Gully Library. I am going to be writing about stepping outside of your comfort zone.

What types of qualities do you need to step outside your comfort zone? Courage? Bravery? Persistence? Resilience? I think they pretty much cover it. This year, I have had to deal with stepping outside of my comfort zone a lot. I still am. Is it easy? No, of course it isn’t. A way to help me through a confronting situation is to think about the positive outcomes. Stepping outside of my comfort zone makes me more confident and independent in the long run, even if at the time I am really nervous or freaking out about it. I know that if I do the certain activity, I will be better off for it.

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‘Stepping outside of my comfort zone makes me more confident and independent in the long run.’

One instance of me stepping outside of my comfort zone was whenever I had to deliver a speech to my class. Sure, it doesn’t seem like a big deal, but I can’t help but get nervous. When I get nervous like that, my hands shake and I talk really fast. I am sure that’s common. However, the more times I get up in front of people and talk to them, the more confident in speaking I will become. Over the year, I have gotten better at speeches in front of people. There is still room for improvement, but practice makes perfect. In all honesty, I don’t mind delivering speeches, but my shaking hands and pounding heart suggest otherwise. It must be a subconscious thing. To get rid of this subconscious worry, I will need to face the anxiety head on by delivering speeches. The more I do it, the more comfortable I will feel, which will decrease my nerves. I hope that in the next couple of years, I will get even better at public speaking.

Another instance of me stepping outside of my comfort zone is performing in front of my drama class. Don’t get me wrong, I love drama, but sometimes doubt seeps into my mind. What if I’m not good enough? I bet everyone else is better than me. This is so embarrassing, I look ridiculous! I don’t even want to know what people are thinking of me right now! Those are some of the thoughts that whirl through my mind as I try to perform. This results me in getting very nervous, my hands shaking, my heart pounding and me speaking my lines way too fast. Sometimes, my performance levels will drop because I’m too scared that I will look ridiculous. If I am holding a prop, it will be very obvious my hands are shaking. I have to do a monologue in drama for my exam in a few weeks and I find it very difficult to rehearse it in front of everyone, as my character gets a little crazy. However, the more times I do it, the more times I step out of my comfort zone, the easier it gets. My confidence has built so much since my first drama lesson this year. My teacher has noticed it too. I now can rehearse my monologue or other parts of the script without the nerves or fear of people watching me. Again, there’s still room for improvement, but if I keep persevering, I will get there. I love drama and wish to continue it throughout school and maybe even after it, so if I can build my confidence, which would enhance my skills, that would be amazing.


One of the biggest examples of me stepping outside my comfort zone is when I volunteered to go to my school’s Sri Lanka mission trip. At first, I was just very excited. I haven’t really been overseas before, aside from a cruise to the Pacific islands with my family. I have never been on an international flight. I haven’t been that far from home before. This would be the longest time away from my family and most of my friends. As the time got closer, I started to feel more nervous, doubts creeping into my mind. It was feeling a lot more real to me now. What if I couldn’t do something that the team wanted me to do while I was away? What if I humiliated myself? What if something goes wrong? What if people in the team didn’t want to talk to me? What if I became lonely? What if the kids at the homes don’t like me? These questions were clouding my mind, making me feel more anxious about the trip. Even with all of my doubts, it didn’t stop me from wanting to go. I still wanted to make a difference to the kids’ lives. I leave for Sri Lanka this Sunday, which is both exciting and scary. I need to step outside of my comfort zone and deal with any problems that come my way the best that I can. I have pushed out all of the negative thoughts and try to focus on the positive. Just because it’s a new situation doesn’t mean that it will be bad.


The most recent instance, which also includes the time that I was writing this, is my work experience. I applied to the Tea Tree Gully Library. I thought it would take a while for them to contact me, but it only took about a week or two, which was a pleasant surprise. I have to be honest here. I, like almost the entire Year 10 cohort at my school, did not find a work experience placement at the start of the year when we were handed our forms. My reasoning was that the places I already looked up either didn’t accept Year 10’s, didn’t have the correct days, or already had work experience students. I am glad that someone suggested I should try the library, as I do like to read myself. It’d be interesting to see what is going on behind the scenes of a library.  Right up to the moment I stepped into the library, I was feeling extremely nervous. I had no idea what to expect or where to go. The same could be said for the interview process. I was worried because I had just come from school and was still in my PE uniform! I had wished I had time to change. At least when I went into the work experience week, I had time to make myself look presentable.

Once I got to the council, one of the librarians came and got me and brought me down to the work room. This was when I was most nervous, but I pushed through it and carried on. There were a few little introductions. I knew I wouldn’t remember anyone’s names straight away because I am not really good at names. Michele talked me through the introduction to the library and gave me a tour. I started to feel more relaxed, but I still felt a little bit nervous. Soon enough, I got into some work. I started off at the chute with Chris G. I enjoyed it, especially since I got to know Chris a little bit better. I think that’s what I like most about each job. I get to talk to and learn more about the workers here at the library. This helped me feel more relaxed. My favourite job on Monday was probably being at the customer service desk. You can interact with customers as well as the staff around you. Even though checking in lots of books and sorting them into the right boxes and trolleys may seem tedious and a little boring, I didn’t mind it. I found myself getting into a rhythm. By the end of the first day, I was really tired. I wasn’t used to this type of work day. I went home tired, but looking forward to coming back for the next few days.

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‘I am glad that someone suggested I should try the library, as I do like to read myself. It’d be interesting to see what is going on behind the scenes of a library.’

On the Tuesday, I had to find my own way to the library, so I decided to take a bus, which is something I don’t normally do. I really didn’t want to get there late because there was a staff meeting, so I decided to get an earlier bus than I had planned. I was a little nervous, but I decided to step out of my comfort zone and have a little faith in myself. It was the right choice. I got to the library in plenty of time. The staff meeting was right at the start of the day and I had a chance to look at all the staff, as I had not met everyone yet. My favourite activity of the day was helping run the ‘Facebook/Messenger on your tablet’ session. Even though I don’t use either application myself, I managed to help some of the people in the session, which was great. This session was a lot different compared to the other jobs that I had done so far. I even learned some things from attending that session. Just like the first day, I put 100% effort into everything I did, even with the more tedious tasks, like labelling wine bottles.

On the Wednesday, I caught the bus again, but I decided to catch a slightly later one. I still made it to the library in plenty of time. The first task I did was to find the expired holds. There wasn’t too many to do, so I spent about 45 minutes also just shelving books. After morning tea was the fun part. I got to attend the ‘Baby Bounce’ and ‘Toddler Time’. A couple of staff members and myself sat in the corner of the library in front of a crowd of kids and their parents. The 10:30 session was for babies and the 11:30 session was for toddlers. What we had to do was sing songs to the kids and do the actions to them. I was nervous and uncertain about it at first, but I quickly got into it. These sessions were something that I have never done before, but I really enjoyed them. The little kids were so cute!

Baby Bounce

‘What we had to do was sing songs to the kids and do the actions to them. I was nervous and uncertain about it at first, but I quickly got into it. ‘

I then spent a couple of hours at the customer service desk. I got into a steady rhythm. After the customer service desk, I had some time to continue this blog. While I was working, one of my school teachers came to see how I was going. We had a quick chat about what type of jobs I was doing. I then went back into the work room to continue writing. After the allocated project time, I attended an early development and index meeting with Holly, another librarian. Throughout the week, it would be disorientating when someone would call my name, but not be talking to me. I have rarely come across someone with the same name as me before. During the meeting, there was a power outage, so a lot of people left early, including me. It turns out the whole state had a power outage.

On Thursday, I started the day by doing holds. However, I only had time to do a few because at 9:15am, there was a morning tea for a staff member’s birthday. That lasted until 10am. I then went to help David for a couple of hours around the library. After that, I did some of the pick list with Stephen. I then spent another couple of hours in the toy library, which was interesting. It was good to interact with Lyn and the volunteers there. After that, I went back to the chute for a while with Pam. We also managed to do some of the pick list as well. To finish the day off, I had more time to work on my blog.

On Friday, my last day of Year 10 work experience, I came into the library early once again. It gave me time to look over my schedule. I started the day by doing some admin with Nicolle. It was a little bit confusing, but if I had more time for it, I am sure that I would have got it. I then went to story time with Kim and Julie. I listened to them read stories to the kids, helped hand out the crafts stuff and joined in with any actions for the songs. The kids were really cute and excitable. After story time, I went back to help Nicolle with admin. After lunch, I worked in the chute and customer service desk one last time. At the end of the day, I had a final catch up with Michele to talk about the week.

Now that the week has ended, I can say that I’m glad that I applied for the library. It gave me a good variety of tasks. It would probably be boring if I did one thing for the whole week. Work experience in general is a great way for kids to break away from their school life and have a glance at the real world. It may be outside of their comfort zones, but it does prepare them to do well in their futures when they do have full time jobs. Work experience gives you more independence and confidence, so I definitely recommend you doing it. Tea Tree Gully Library is a good option if you are unsure of where to go. It gives you a taste at a range of different jobs.


In conclusion, nothing worthwhile in life is easy. You will feel much more joy if you have to put a lot of effort into achieving something. If you could do anything without much thought or effort, the impact of the achievement will be a lot less. Something may be outside of your comfort zone, but don’t let that stop you. Be brave. Be resilient. Be persistent. Have courage.’

Jigsaw puzzles: erasing mental cobwebs since 1760

Jigsaws are good for your head. Fact.

When you put together a jigsaw puzzle, you harness both sides of the brain: the left side of the brain which deals with logic and sequence, and the right side of the brain that deals with emotions and performs tasks holistically. When you use both sides of the brain, it intensely exercises your brain cells and increases brain capacity.

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Staff tackling one of the library’s communal jigsaw puzzles.

The process of completing a jigsaw puzzle is also a form of meditation. Focusing on the same image for a long period can induce calmness and peace in your mind, as your concentration eludes everything else around you.

Chipping away at a jigsaw on a regular basis sharpens your memory and improves your clarity of thought, clearing away mental cobwebs. You can really lose yourself in a jigsaw, just like you do when you read a page turning novel.

London cartographer John Splisbury, is credited with commercialising jigsaw puzzles around 1760 and they have been a hit ever since. Not long afterwards they had the approval from the British royal family, being used in geography lessons for their children. The word jigsaw seems to be a misnomer, as they were meant to be named ‘fretsaws’, after the tools that cut the wooden pieces.

Tea Tree Gully Library has in excess of 200 different jigsaw puzzles. They are all available for customers to take home, without having to formally check them out on their card.

Our jigsaw collection features a range of graphics, including foreign cities, nature panoramas, cartoons and more. There are jigsaws with 100 pieces, and some with 3000. Make your selection on the challenge you’re up for!

You can always contribute to the library’s communal jigsaw table, which is right next to the collection.

 

We got a puppy as a wedding present – Amanda’s story raising a Siberian Husky puppy

Work experience student Amanda shares her adventures and learnings after she and her husband received a new Siberian Husky as a wedding gift. 

2015 was a very big year for me. I got married and I got a dog.

The funny thing is, and this is something most people don’t understand, is that getting our dog was larger, more daunting and more challenging than planning, saving for and pulling off our wedding.

Rubi the puppy

Rubi’s evil puppy face

Our wedding and our dog go hand in hand because she was given to us as a gift for our wedding. Normally I hate pets as gifts, so if you ever think about buying anyone a puppy, just don’t. This situation was slightly different as Kelly the lovely gifter, breeds Siberian Huskies. She suggested this gift to us when we got engaged and before her dogs were even pregnant! This gave us from February to July to figure out if this was what we wanted.

When you decide that you want to bring a fluffy bundle of ‘joy’ into your home you need to do breed research. This I STRESS. You need to write a list. What kind of house do you have? What kind of yard do you have? How much time can you take out of your day for outings? Do you have children? Do you want children? Do you have a cat?  What do you want from a dog? Do you want a lap dog, a dog to run with, a companion? Or in our case, another cat in dogs clothing.

My husband and I wrote this list long ago when we were deciding to get a dog. Well before our engagement and well before Kelly’s offer. We have an old house that is a pet friendly rental. Our backyard is smallish but I (not my husband) do enjoy a long walk. We both work casually in retail so one of us is normally home and we have heaps of spare time.

We have no children, we want children but not until we are much older and more mature. I have a cat, his name is Louy, he is a giant and he doesn’t like dogs. We want an all-rounder dog. Active but still up for pats, intelligent, able to be left on their own on rare days we work the same shift, able to stay outside so not to traumatise the cat. With these stipulations in place, we made another list.

Cute dogs! What are they and where do we get them! I really love Great Danes, with their big drooling faces and their friendly cuddly personalities. Ben wanted a Siberian Husky because they are exotic, beautiful and interesting. I wanted a German Shepherd, mainly because their ears are floppy as puppies then they stand up, one at a time. So they go through an awkward teenager stage.  Ben wanted a Boxer, because his parents own them and he has had them all his life. Armed with our lists… we made more lists!

The Great Dane pro and con list was up first. So we researched, researched, researched.  YouTube is a great way to find out about dog breeds. Dogs 101 has a whole set of short clips talking about breed personalities, health, costs etc. with a neat little summary at the end.

I found a YouTube channel called Honey the Great Dane, which is basically about a family who have video-blogged their journey with their Great Dane Honey, from puppyhood to adulthood. From these videos and other websites I learnt that Great Danes really aren’t the dog we need right now. Because? They are $2500 to buy, which is more than my car is worth and it does not include spaying or vaccinations.

They only live until they are 7, so not too much bang for your buck and I am not ready for that heartbreak. When they are puppies and they break into a run they can break their big gawky legs and be crippled for life. If they eat too much, they can get bloat and die. If they eat puppy food their joints can become engorged and they can die. So you can see where this is going – two casual retail workers can’t afford the Great Dane vet bills!

German Shepherd list:
Heavy chewer, hip dysplasia, fear biting, $1500 outright cost! Ugh.

Boxer list:
General consensus is this dog is as dumb a doorknob, which was further proved by Ben’s lovely parents buying a boxer puppy. His name is Harvey, and he is an absolute idiot who can’t breathe out of his own nose or eat proper dog food because of the shape of his snout.

At this point we’re hoping Siberian Huskies are perfect. Or we’re just getting cats. Hundreds of cats.

Husky list:
Escape artists, cat-like personality where they don’t care what you think, need hours and hours of exercise, will eat my cat if given the opportunity, will cost $1000, difficult to train. Dogs 101 described the husky as ‘a real dog’. Which I think means maybe they aren’t as domesticated as an Australian Silky Terrier (my beloved previous pet, Aussie).

After all this research Ben and I were pretty down in the dumps. No dog for us just yet.

Then we got engaged, and Kelly said, “Hey do you want a puppy for free?”

We had already done the research, and huskies did have more pros than the other dogs mentioned. So we asked our landlord and he said yes. So we said yes.

Kelly went on to give us plenty of husky tips and tricks to help us cope with the new addition to our family. She said to get a girl because boys are bigger and stronger and more difficult to deal with. So we said “Pick us your favourite gal and we will come to Mildura and get her when she is ready.”

When Rubi turned 8 weeks old we made the trip to Mildura to pick her up on a weekend, where we had family plans. We picked her up in the morning and she came to every house we visited, she was kissed and cuddled and she played with Golden Retriever friends, Sausage dog friends and everyone thought she was beautiful.

By the time it was time for the four-hour drive home, Rubi was pooped. So she slept like a baby all the way home, and went on to sleep comfortably in the laundry all night long, and we thought… “Well she seems pretty chill.”

Nope. This dog had to be the most not-chill dog ever to reside on this earth. The first day we had our baby in our house was typical of new puppies. They aren’t like cats that use a litter box – they need to be trained. The best way to train any animal if you want a loving relationship is positive reinforcement training, which means every 30 minutes (because puppies have very small weak bladders) you need take your puppy outside and wait.

Somehow, Rubi’s bladder always had a different schedule than our backyard outings. We would take her out after she had eaten and wait. Sometimes for hours. Then we would give up and go inside (we have things to do you know).

As soon as we entered the house. Oh! Suddenly her bowels worked and she took a turd on the rug. The rug, the only piece of carpet in the entire house! If you’re going to have accidents, dog, have them on the 100 square metres of floorboard!

On the rare occasion she was outside and went to the loo, we would drop what we were doing and immediately rush out and say “You go Rubi!”

To this day she still isn’t house trained.

Rubi the husky

Rubi in the car – covered in dog park filth.

Another thing we learned about Rubi when we brought her home: after living with two children who fawned over her and then switching to two adults who need time to do things alone … she had severe separation anxiety. Lucky I like research because I needed all my skills to figure this one out.

On our second night together, she was certainly not as tired because puppies can’t really go into the world until they are 16 weeks old, due to vaccinations. So we set her up all comfy in the laundry, closed the door and went to bed. She started howling and sooking which is expected from puppies at bedtime.

Normally they quiet down after 10-20 minutes or so and snooze. Not Rubi. Four straight hours of screaming and throwing herself against the door! It’s now 3am and I start work in two hours, so we let her into our bedroom and she went to sleep. We gave up. We also almost had a divorce before we were even married. We felt like teens with a toddler. It was too much.

But it’s important not to give up – if she was a toddler we certainly wouldn’t give her away. We would keep going. So we did.

I made Rubi a mix tape, of calming tunes that dogs apparently like. She yelled at most of them, but she really liked Linkin Park’s In The End for some reason. To this day I can sing it to her and she calms down. So now the plan: put her in her bedroom with Linkin Park playing by herself, pop our heads in five minutes later and tell her we love her, and slowly the times between seeing us would get longer. It took us weeks. But she got better and soon we had a dog that is so independent, sometimes I feel like when I go out to see her I’m interrupting her plans for the day or something.

Another of the most important parts of a dog’s life is socialisation; dogs need to play with other dogs. Luckily for Ben and I, we have a dog park nearby, so when she got all of her shots, we took her down to hopefully meet some doggy friends.

When we arrived we were overwhelmed, there were probably about 40 dogs there. Not small dogs either! I know now they are regulars so I can easily list them: a Burmese Mastiff called Fred, a German Shepherd (the leader of dog park) named Flynn, Luna the Labrador, Bella the Golden Retriever, Milo the Groodle (who is massive much to his owners surprise), and what feels like hundreds of others.

Rubi spent the hour between my legs just watching. But after a year of going everyday she now has more best friends than I do and she gets upset when we don’t take her to catch up with her mates. And when she is upset she eats the sheets off the line, so we try to keep her happy.

Beach Dog Days

Beach Dog Days

Despite all the trials and tribulations of owning an ADHD puppy with the strength of the ox … Rubi is a very much-loved member of our family. Her crazy personality can be wearing some days, but most days we find her entertaining.

The best part is she got us off the couch. This dog took a couple of humans who lived watching TV and playing video games, and dragged them outside for long walks, beach days and sometimes, even some running.

She made us more active and healthy and provided us with a routine. She also has given us the responsibility of looking out for her. She may be only our dog, but we are her world and therefore we’re charged with making that the best world possible. The responsibility is nerve-racking to think about, but really, she is 18 months old now and she is happy and healthy. The vet even said “Perfect!”

So my husband and I have nailed it, and there is no better feeling. So if you are thinking of adding a fluffy member to the family – be prepared. Be prepared for anything! It’s all trial and error. Do your research and good luck!

Dyslexia Friendly Collection

The more you read, the easier it becomes. But for those who struggle with words, reading is not always fun, and it’s easy to lose heart and stop trying.

Tea Tree Gully Library has recently made it easier to find dyslexia-friendly books and audiobooks by putting them in their own space  in the children’s and teen areas. They now have signage and coloured labels so they are easy to find.

To search for dyslexia friendly books, type in ‘dyslexia’ in the catalogue, just like below, and from there you can select the ‘dyslexia’ boxes on the left-hand side.

dyslexia friendly

Dyslexia primarily affects the ability to learn, read and spell. Sometimes maths is affected as well.  It’s important to remember that having dyslexia is not related to someone’s general intelligence. It comes from a difficulty in dealing with the sounds of words. People with dyslexia often find it hard to remember lists of things they have heard, or to remember names or facts quickly, although they often have strengths in reasoning, visual and creative fields.

Features of Dyslexia Friendly Books:

  • A font style and size that is clear to read.
  • Off-white paper that is kinder to the eyes as it reduces glare from the high contrast of black against white.
  • Spacing between letters, lines and paragraphs
  • Age appropriate content and story lines but with less text to a page and more pictures
  • Shorter chapters to give the eyes natural ‘rest’ breaks

Where are they located?

Children’s Area: Find them in the area near the book series boxes.

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Book stickers on Dyslexia Friendly Collection (DXF-C) in the children’s area of Tea Tree Gully Library

DXFC

You can find dyslexia friendly books and audio books among the Children’s book series boxes in the Children’s Area.

Teens Area: You can find them on the last shelf facing the public computers.

Stickers on the Dyslexia Friendly Books in the Teen Area

Stickers on the Dyslexia Friendly Books in the Teen Area

Find the DXF-T books in the shelf that faces the computers (in the Teen Area).

Find the DXF-T books in the shelf that faces the computers (in the Teen Area).

We hope our new collections appeal to children and young people who have dyslexia or who are reluctant to read. May they inspire a new love of reading!

Trove newspaper training Wed 29 July

Trove is a search engine focusing on Australia and Australians. It is managed by the National Library of Australia. In this session you will learn how to use it so you can find old newspaper and magazine articles and more, dating back to the 19th century. Start exploring!

When: Wednesday 29 July, 6-7pm

Where: City of Tea Tree Gully Library

Bookings essential. Phone 8397 7333 or book here

Baby Bounce babies learn quick and develop skills fast

Baby Bounce

Some of the regulars who attend Baby Bounce at Tea Tree Gully Library

The benefits of Tea Tree Gully Library’s Baby Bounce and Rhyme program are immense for babies and their mothers. In 2014 the Library added a third weekly session of Baby Bounce due to demand – and ever since, that session (Friday 12-12.30pm) has become our most popular timeslot!

Baby Bounce regular Elizabeth Cragg-Sapsford, from Modbury North brings baby daughter Lillian to a session every week. She said she was the first in her group of friends with children to hear about Baby Bounce and give it a go.

‘Lillian loves it. She does all the actions and is a quick learner. You just have to say ‘Open shut them’ to her and she starts doing the actions,’ Elizabeth says.

‘I love to be busy and I love to engage Lillian. Baby Bounce is free and it’s at a good time for me on a Thursday – it fits in with my life and my to-do list. It’s part of our routine.’

Lillian was born premature, and even though doctors had recommended various specialists and programs at leading Adelaide hospitals to improve her development skills, Elizabeth says she’s never required them.

‘Lillian was a premmie baby and since doing Baby Bounce she hasn’t had to go to any special development appointments or classes at the hospital. She hasn’t needed it. She has the same language skills and sounds as any other baby her age. She can make heaps of different sounds. When she says ‘hi/bye’ it’s really clear. Same when she says ‘mum or dad’.

Growing up, Elizabeth was surrounded by a family deeply involved in music, something she wanted Lillian to experience as early as possible.

‘Baby Bounce puts music into her life, it’s like music therapy. She’s doing so well.

‘At the hospital they offered a pediatric class and physio/speech therapy sessions for early born babies and I haven’t had to do that at all with Lillian or give her any special intervention.

‘Seeing Lillian engage in singing and nursery rhymes has been great. She wasn’t a baby who initially slept well. Now she seems more relaxed and settles easily.

‘I’ve met another lady through Baby Bounce and we’ve become close and now we have formed a friendship group. All of the kids get along really well.’

It heartens Elizabeth to see Lillian’s bright eyes, smiling face and quick responses at the Baby Bounce sessions, which she plans to keep attending, until she’s ready for the next level – Toddler Time!

‘I think the group sessions work. I could have looked up nursery rhymes on YouTube and played them to her but then she wouldn’t have had the group stimulation or seen all the babies around her doing all the actions. It’s definitely helped me as a mother, taking her to the Baby Bounce sessions and participating in a group and something bigger.

‘She loves it – she’s already starting to clap when we walk into the library.’

Baby Bounce is held at the Tea Tree Gully Library three times every week. It is an interactive way for parents and carers to introduce babies to the enjoyment of sharing nursery rhymes, action songs and simple percussion instruments. Sessions are lively, interactive and stimulating for both babies and carers. For ages 0-2 years.

Times:

Wednesday: 10:30am – 11am

Thursday: 10:30am – 11am

Friday: 12 -12.30pm

Baby Bounce sessions are all free! No bookings are required. Please arrive at least 15 minutes early to get a seat. Please note sessions are only held on Thursdays during school holidays.