Way back when,Wednesdays

Our library enters the computer age

Library enters computer age

The North East Leader a Messenger Newspaper reported on the beginning of the information technology revolution at the City of Tea Tree Gully Library, on page 3 of the edition dated 15 June 1983. Computer technology had been installed which would benefit local residents and enable staff to store information about all of the books in the library.

Just like magic a librarian could wave a computer wand across a member’s credit card sized borrower’s permit (their library card) to reveal their identification number. The customer could then borrow when the wand was waved across a barcode on a book, as the computer would correlate and store this information electronically. Imagine that! Furthermore, the computer referencing system would allow library staff to easily see if books were on loan and to whom.

To put the wonder of all this change into perspective, it helps to know how people used to borrow books before the installation of computer technology.
Website Quora recalls how libraries used to operate (https://www.quora.com/How-did-old-library-systems-work-before-computer-catalogues)

Some readers might remember using the card catalogue at the library. Library staff would type or write out three or more cards for each book. The catalogue cards would detail information such as its title, author, date of publication, subject area, and the call number which indicated where it was shelved in the Library. Then librarians would file each of these cards in alphabetical order in separate drawers labelled title, author and subject area. Customers and staff would have to rifle through a long row of cards, to find out if the library actually held a book and to find out where they could locate it on the shelf. You didn’t want to lose your place either or the cards would fall back in order!

card-catalog what fun

Searhing through the Library’s card catalogue.  Image:  https://brockport175.wordpress.com/2010/11/30/card-catalogs-what-fun/

 

CR 123 Hand-typed card

An example of a typewritten library catalogue card for a novel.  Image:  http://tarletonlibrary.blogspot.com/2012/09/monteverde-friends-library-of-costa-rica.html

So what happened when you finally found the book you wanted to borrow and took it to the service desk?

The North East Leader article is correct when it reported that computers would allow library staff more time to assist customers with enquiries! Each library book used to have a card in a pocket stuck inside its cover. Library staff would remove the due date card from the book pocket then stamp it with the date the book was to be returned. They would record a patron’s name and library card number alongside the due date of the book. In some libraries members also had to sign the book out. Then the date card would be placed in sequence in a special holder.

ebae0ee36127733e8af0ae8a8ecc5547 Card in pocket

Image:  https://www.pinterest.com.au/pin/126171227036239502/ card in pocket

Staff would either stamp piece of paper which was stuck inside the book or place a due date slip inside the book’s pocket, so that a customer could see when the book was due for return. Alternatively, librarians might spend ages stamping due date slips when it was quiet in the library.

170px-Library_date_due_slip

An example of a due date slip which would have been stuck inside a book’s cover.  Image:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Library_circulation

When somebody returned a book, a librarian would take the date card out of the holder and return it to the pocket in the back of the book. The book would then go onto a trolley for re-shelving, and the circulation process would begin again. At regular intervals a librarian would manually check the date cards to identify overdue books. They would look up the patron by name in the library’s membership records and send out a reminder notice.

Library Technology Officer Hayley was happy to discuss how library systems had changed at Tea Tree Gully Library since the time that this article appeared in the North East Leader. Here are some of the significant improvements for our customers:

Since our Library has embraced Radio-Frequency IDentification technology (RFID) Library staff no longer have to scan and read the barcode of each item to issue it to a customer. Items can now be borrowed and returned using RFID technology which sends a signal from the item to the computer.

Our customers no longer have to stand in long queues to borrow items as you can use our self-check machines at your leisure. RFID allows for multiple items to be processed at the same time which can be more convenient than scanning them one by one.

Notice also in the North East Leader article that the original computer screens had a dark background with coloured print. Nowadays the desktop where we search the library catalogue is visually enticing and much easier to read.

The One Card Library Network has transformed the public library service in this state. Through a shared computer network customers can access millions of items available throughout South Australian public libraries, not just at Tea Tree Gully Library.

The implementation of the One Card Network has also greatly reduced the time that library members have to wait when they reserve, or put an item on hold. Aside from new items, customers will generally be sent the first copy that becomes available, whether that be from your local library or as far away as Cooper Pedy!

With the introduction of the new Libraries SA App customers can save their card digitally and have it available on their mobile device. The app also allows customers to place holds, view checkouts and renew items.

Library staff and customers may not have believed that these changes were possible when this article went to print in 1983! And to quote the words of the late comedian and civil rights activist Dick Gregory “The only good thing about the good old days is that they’re gone.”

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Way back when, Wednesdays

The stressless classroom for seniors

Albert Einstein once remarked that “Once you stop learning, you start dying” (http://www.basicknowledge101.com/subjects/educationquotes.html). There is also the proverb that you are never too old to learn. On page 10 of the edition dated Wednesday 18 February 1987, the Leader Messenger reported on the new Tea Tree Gully branch of the University of the Third Age, where retired people could participate in a variety of courses for learning and recreation and share their knowledge and experience with others.

U3A

The Tea Tree Gully branch of the University of the Third Age (U3A) was established in 1987. 31 years later it is still thriving, with members meeting at 22 Golden Grove Road, Modbury North.

We speak of the Third Age as a time of active retirement. It follows the first age of childhood and formal education and the second age of working life. The Third Age precedes the fourth age of dependence (https://www.u3a.org.au/u3a_movement). The University of the Third Age is an international non-profit organisation which advocates that we should have access to life-long learning opportunities and the pursuit of knowledge, in a supportive environment where mutual learning and teaching flourish. So what feels like the end for retirees is often the beginning (https://www.goodmorningquote.com)

The British U3A embraced the philosophy on which the medieval university was founded: A fellowship of equals who met to share and extend knowledge. The British U3A embraces the principles of self-help and self-determination. Acknowledging that older people have accumulated a lifetime of knowledge and experience, members of each branch develop and structures their own programs, based on the strength and interests of their learning community.  Group members plan and develop a syllabus for each course that the offer and those with specialist experience teach on a voluntary basis. Other members assist in the administration of U3A. Each group is autonomous and manages itself.

Logo U3A 2

University of the Third Age logo

The Australian U3A is based on the British model. In 1984 the first Australian U3A opened in Melbourne. Universities of the Third Age in South Australia, New South Wales, Victoria, the Australian Capital Territory, Queensland and Western Australia have established intrastate networks to support the different branches in each state with a range of resources (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/University_of_the_Third_Age).

If you would like more information about the Tea Tree Gully University of the Third Age log on to the website at: http://users.tpg.com.au/u3attg/index.html

TTG University Third Age

The Tea Tree Gully branch of the University of the Third Age situated at 22 Golden Grove Road, Modbury North.

Members pay a membership fee when they enroll in their first course. They can experience the joy of learning for learning’s sake as there are no examinations or certificates to be obtained. No educational qualifications are required. Courses are designed to offer participants a range of educational, creative and leisure activities, with opportunities to socialise and enjoy yourself!

Now there is even a virtual branch of the University of the Third Age at https://www.u3aonline.org.au/  U3A Online is the world-first virtual University of the Third Age to deliver online learning via the Internet. U3A Online is especially suited to older people who may be geographically, physically or socially isolated. The website also provides links for older people to access useful information about different topics, such as news, maintaining good health and staying safe online.  You can also find your local branch of the U3A.

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Creating a Facebook page for your business or community group

Cafe owners with laptop 46982788_ml

When: Monday 18 July from 11:00 am – 12.15pm

Where:  City of Tea Tree Gully Library

Facebook logo It seems that everybody is on Facebook nowadays.

In addition to socialising online with your friends, Facebook can be a very effective vehicle to keep in regular contact with your business’s customers or members of your community group.

You can use your Facebook page to promote products and events, attract a new clientele and build relationships and goodwill with your existing customer or membership base.

If you are you interested in starting a Facebook Page for your business or community group, this free session will teach you the steps involved in creating a Facebook page and how to market to your audience.

Perhaps you have questions you want answered such as:

¨ Can I assign someone else to help manage my page?

¨ What is the best strategy to grow my page?

¨ Should I pay Facebook to advertise my business or community group?

Then this is the course for you!  Bookings are essential and can be made online.  Or telephone 8397 7333.

 

 

Cyber Safety Survey

Tell us what you are doing to stay safe online.

Digital safetyIf you’re aged 18 or over, visit www.teatreegully.sa.gov.au/cybersafety and take our quick 10-minute survey survey.

Your feedback will help us to become an eSmart accredited library and tailor our cybersafety programs and training to our community’s needs.

If you have any questions please speak to a library staff member or call or email us.
Phone: 8397 7333
Email: library_systems@cttg.sa.gov.au

Trove newspaper training Wed 29 July

Trove is a search engine focusing on Australia and Australians. It is managed by the National Library of Australia. In this session you will learn how to use it so you can find old newspaper and magazine articles and more, dating back to the 19th century. Start exploring!

When: Wednesday 29 July, 6-7pm

Where: City of Tea Tree Gully Library

Bookings essential. Phone 8397 7333 or book here

NBN Info Session Wed 22 July

What is the NBN? When is it coming? How much will it cost? How do you get ready for it? How do you connect?

NBN Info Session

To answer these and other questions, NBN Co and the City of Tea Tree Gully invite you to attend an NBN Community Information Session: You and the NBN – getting ready and getting connected.

This is your opportunity to hear from NBN Co and Internet service providers on:

  • What to consider before you connect
  • How to connect
  • Pricing and packages

When: Wednesday 22 July
1-2pm Sit-down presentation  – book here
2-5pm Drop-in for a coffee & a quick personal Q&A – no bookings required
6-7pm Sit-down presentation – book here

Bookings are essential. Book online through the links above or phone 8397 7333.

Free Computer and IT Skills Training at the Library

Tea Tree Gully Library continues to provide free classes for learning new computer and Internet skills at the Digital Hub each month.

Tea Tree Gully Digital Hub

Tea Tree Gully Digital Hub

You can choose to attend a group training session on the monthly timetable or book a one-on-one session at a time that suits you.

GROUP TRAINING SESSIONS

Group sessions are conducted in an informal, supportive and friendly environment in the Tea Tree Gully Library.

Each month we hold classes for beginners learning how to use their iPads, Android tablets, Windows 8 and many more.

Visit our Events Calendar to see what’s on offer each month and make an online booking.
Bookings can also be made at the Library or by phoning 8397 7333.

One on One Sessions

If you would like a more personalised session, book in for a one-on-one session with a professional IT trainer at the Library. All of these sessions are free and run for 45 minutes.

We can offer assistance with:

  • iPads and Android tablets
  • Windows 8
  • Basic computer and internet skills
  • Setting up an email account
  • Online banking, job seeking and online forms
  • Social media (Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, WhatsApp etc)

Bookings are essential and can be made at the Library or by phoning 8397 7333.

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