What was your favourite read from 2017?

Despite ‘The Barefoot Investor’ dominating book talk and library requests in 2017, our staff still managed to branch out and discover some other new reads for themselves.

Here’s what some staff rated as their favourite read of 2017:

Victoria the Queen
Ali – My fave from 2017 was Victoria the Queen by Julia Baird

I’m still reading it actually, as it’s a bit of a tome! It’s well-researched and written, interesting, compelling and definitely not a dry historical book. I heard a podcast on ‘Conversations with Richard Fidler’ were Julia Baird told how she had access to primary sources in the archives at Windsor Castle.

The book covers all aspects of Victoria’s life – personal, family and political, and shows perhaps a more truthful view of the queen without referring to clichés and preconceptions. I would recommend this book if you like biographies.

 

 

The Diary of a Bookseller

Helen – I read a few books in 2017, but my favourite was The Book Shop by Shaun Bythell

It is a non-fiction diary style account of the day-to-day events in Scotland’s second-largest secondhand bookstore in Wigtown. It is written in a matter-of-fact account of what happens each day in the life of a secondhand book store. The humour is very dry – but laugh out loud funny! Through reading each diary entry, I got to know more about the staff who worked at the store (or who didn’t in some cases) and the challenges of running a business – especially in the digital age – and the owner’s fight with Kindles.

I feel I enjoyed it due to some similarities of the customers encountered by public libraries. The bookshop has its own Facebook page – which is just as amusing as the book itself. Thankfully there is a follow-on book!

 

Hunger by Roxanne Gay

 

Hayley –

I had a heap of stand-outs this year but my top pick would be Hunger by Roxanne Gay

This book is a memoir about the author’s relationship with her body after she is attacked as a young girl. Roxanne Gay’s writing is raw, beautiful and powerful. I couldn’t put it down.

 

 

 

 

 


The Handmaid's Tale

Eleanor –

Last year I had to read The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood for an English class at university. After a few pages, I was completely hooked. It’s a beautifully crafted, chilling story that explores gender, freedom, control, and consequences in a dystopian society. The Handmaid’s Tale is a timeless classic that I would thoroughly recommend!

 

 

 

 

 

The Art of Asking

Penny – 

I picked up The Art of Asking by Amanda Palmer at Dillon’s Bookshop in Norwood early last year, after my curiosity was piqued by the striking book cover. Two things stood out straight away – Amanda’s sharp and honest writing, and the incredible anecdotes she weaves together to share her story from poverty-stricken street artist to world famous cabaret-punk performer. The scenes she writes about asking for money from her husband, writer Neil Gaiman, are hilarious and show how much confidence she lacked, when she felt she couldn’t ask her husband to financially support her during a downtime. It’s a great book for creatives, and navigates the tricky area of exchange in the Digital Age.

Did you know…about Chinese New Year?

Tomorrow, February the 16th will be Chinese New Year for 2018 and herald in the Year of the Dog. known as Sheng Xiao, the Chinese Zodiak is based on a twelve year cycle, with each year of the cycle represented by an animal and is calaculated based on the Chinese lunar calendar.

The twelve animals are (in order of the calendar) the Rat, Ox, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Goat, Monkey, Rooster, Dog and Pig.

Why these animals, you may ask?

As the calendar dates back to the Han Dynasty (and possibly earlier) the truth may have been lost, but there are several legends.

One ancient tale tells the story of the great race. The Jade Emperor (the head of the Chinese pantheon of gods) had called a meeting of the animals and had decreed that the years of the zodiac would be named according to the order in which the animals arrived. To reach the emperor, all of the animals would have to cross a wide river. Now, the Rat and the Cat were not very good swimmers, so they asked the Ox if they could ride on his back. The Ox (who was very kind) agreed to carry them, but half way across the river, the Rat pushed the Cat in! He then jumped of the Ox and ran to the emperor’s side, becoming the first animal of the Zodiac. It is said that this is the reason Cats hate Rats.

Conversely, a Buddhist story tells of the Buddha summoning all of the animals of the earth to come before him before he departed, but only twelve came to bid him farewell. As a reward, the Buddha named the years for these twelve.

Would you like to know more about Chinese New Year? Why not check out some of the library resources on the subject? Or, if you have pre-school aged children, why not come to a special Storytime in the library tomorrow at 10:15am?

 

Way back when, Wednesdays

For the woman who loves cheesecake

In the summer of 1968, the North East Leader, a Messenger Newspaper featured a section dedicated to its female readership, on page 4 of the edition dated 17 January. A Page for Women was made up of articles that were deemed to be of interest to the average woman in the 1960s.

Take a look at these articles which are predominantly about social occasions: a birthday and weddings. Plus advertisements for home furnishings and the latest ‘modern’ novels to enjoy, when you had finished spending most of your day on home duties and looking after your family. You might reflect that many publications aimed at women still focus on Society, weddings, celebrities, home decor and recipes!

modern novels plus shopping

celebrations

Burns for Blinds

Future Liberal politician, member for the seat of Kavel (1970 to 1992) and 3rd Deputy Premier of SA (1979 to 1982) Roger Goldsworthy also managed to secure some advertising space to criticise the State Government in office at the time (The Labor Government with Don Dunstan as Premier).

Roger Goldsworthy advertisement

For a fabulous dinner party, to celebrate a special occasion, to impress family and friends or perhaps to entertain your husband’s boss, the North East Leader printed this recipe for a pineapple cheesecake.

You might like to make it for your loved one! Let us know how it tastes. You will need scales which measure weight in the Imperial system or go to http://www.metric-conversions.org/weight/ounces-to-grams.htm to convert to Metric.

You can use butter or salt reduced margarine for the melted shortening. You may also substitute cream cheese for smooth ‘creamed, cottage cheese’ if you wished. To make cottage cheese less crumbly, cooks online recommend adding a little cream, https://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/16693/can-i-use-cottage-cheese-instead-of-cream-cheese-when-making-a-cheesecake

Pineapple Cheesecake

Ingredients

For the biscuit crust:

2 cups crushed plain biscuits
¼ cup sugar
2 teaspoons ginger
4-6 ounces melted shortening

Method

Combine all ingredients. Press into the sides and bottom of an 8 inch spring form tin. Chill.

Ingredients

For the filling:

1 15 ounce can well-drained crushed pineapple in juice.                                                             Note:  You can now buy a 440g tin of crushed pineapple in supermarkets.
1 1/2 tablespoons gelatine
1 tablespoon grated lemon rind
1/4 cup lemon juice
½ pound creamed cottage cheese
1 cup sugar
1 large can of undiluted evaporative milk, chilled icy cold.
1 teaspoon vanilla essence

Method

Soften gelatine in ½ cup pineapple juice and dissolve with lemon rind over hot water. Cool. Cream cottage cheese and sugar together. Add cooled lemon juice and gelatine, cool until partially set. Whip the icy cold evaporated milk in a large bowl to soft peaks. Beat in gelatine, cheese mixture and vanilla essence. Fold in crushed pineapple. Pour into crumb crust. Chill 6 – 8 hours or overnight.

Ingredients

The glaze

½ cup remaining pineapple juice
2 tablespoons sugar
1 dessertspoon cornflour
¼ cup lemon juice

Method

Blend cornflour and sugar, stir in lemon and pineapple juices. Cook until boiling, stirring constantly. Cool. Spread over cheesecake top, decorate as desired. Serves 6 to 8.

Pineapple cheesecake

#waybackwhenwednesdays

Way back when, Wednesdays

Come in, the water’s fine at Clovercrest

Did you learn to swim at Clovercrest? It seems that everybody either went to swimming lessons at the Clovercrest swimming school or knows somebody who did. On page 3 of the edition dated 21 February 1968 the North East Leader, a Messenger Newspaper printed a feature about the opening of the new Clovercrest pool. On Sunday 2 February over 200 guests attended that official opening of the 25 metre heated indoor pool, which as the article below states, was reputed to be the most modern facility of its kind in Australia.

 

Opening of Clovercrest swimming centre

Photographs of bikini clad women have not changed since 1968!

 

The Clovercrest Pool is situated at 433 Montague Road, Modbury North. On the 6 March 1968 the North East Leader followed up with a story on page 5 about swimming lessons for pre-school children, which was named the Tadpole class. Today children aged from 6 months to 4 years of age can enrol in the Waterbabies class! The Clovercrest Pool also took out a large advertisement showcasing it services on page 2.

Tadpole class

 

Pool advertisement

A special carnival for amateur swimmers (the first of its kind to be held at Clovercrest) made front page news on 19 April 1968. Money raised from the two day event would go towards helping the Australian Swim Team get to the 1968 Mexico City Olympic Games. The directors of the Centre donated the use of the pool to the South Australian Amateur Swimming Association. Such a high profile event would have brought many people to the pool. The young people who entered the competition may have felt very special sponsoring the Olympic athletes. Many were named in the article below.

Swimming carnival

Some of our staff members at Tea Tree Gully Library recall going to the Pool during the 1970s and 1980s. “I remember learning to swim after school at Clovercrest, when the different grades were named after sea creatures – you would strive to attain the dolphin and then the kingfisher certificates. If you completed all of the levels of tuition you could join the Centre’s swimming club. I admired these older kids who swam really fast in the lanes devoted to lap swimming.”

“It was steamy and hot inside the pool area and you could see the reflection of the water on the walls. After swimming you were always hungry and it you looked forward to buying something from the pool kiosk. It was the first and the last time I ate a huge Bush biscuit, after my parents urged me to try one!”

The Clovercrest Swim Club was also founded in 1968. It is now affiliated with Swimming SA, and is a member of Swimming Australia. Members have taken part in competitions interstate and overseas (https://clovercrest.swimming.org.au).

1976 was a special year for the Clovercrest Swimming School when David Urry, the former coach of the Australian swimming team at the Christchurch Commonwealth Games purchased the facility. It was at Clovercrest that he developed the State Swim program. Today State Swim has schools at eighteen locations across South Australia, Western Australia and Victoria (https://www.stateswim.com.au).

 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Clovercrest Swimming School, present day.

 

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Way back when, Wednesdays

Not a winning combination

Nowadays we usually associate smoking with developing a life threatening illness. Not with physical fitness and sporting prowess. In a time before the national Quit campaign, when tobacco companies used to sponsor sporting events, the North East Leader a Messenger Newspaper published an advertising promotion for the Fairview Park Shopping Centre, on page 6 of the edition dated 9 July, 1968.  Women could enter the ‘Housewives basketball championship’ at the shopping centre to win $5 in prizemoney plus a big carton of Trent cigarettes.

Shoot a goal to win

In the early 1960s the number of smokers actually declined in Australia – 60% of men and 30% of women smoked (http://tobaccocontrol.bmj.com/content/12/suppl_2/ii9). It seems obvious to the reader that not only is the management of Fairview Park Shopping Centre running the competition to get women to come and spend money in its shops but also that Trent Cigarettes is trying to raise the profile of its brand with women and increase sales of tobacco.

FP Shopping centre

It is strange to think that anybody once believed that smokers could actually be fit and good at sport. However, the Australian Government Department of Health website tells us that “Historically, tobacco advertisements have used images and messages that feature health, success, youth and leisure. The constant linking of cigarettes with such messages distracts people from the reality that smoking causes illness and death.”  (http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/content/egtap)

7413317446_b4f4f0ce6e_b shops in 1969

The Fairview Park shops in 1969

 

Fairview-Shopping-Centre3

Present day: Fairview Park Shopping Centre has been redeveloped and is now known as Fairview Green

 

Even back in 1964 the US Surgeon General made public a report linking smoking, illness and death. However, it wasn’t until 1973 in Australia that we started putting the warning “Smoking is a health hazard” on cigarette packets (http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-01-10/timeline3a-smoking-report-marks-50th-anniversary/5192838).

In the 1960s the majority of women left work to become ‘housewives’ once they became pregnant. The Reserve Bank Inflation Calculator (https://www.rba.gov.au/calculator/annualDecimal.html) estimates that the prize money a woman could win in the basketball competition in 1968 would equate to $59.59 in 2016. This does not seem to be a large amount. However, women who were reliant on their husband’s earning might have liked to win some money for themselves by shooting a goal. And all finalists received a bonus prize of cigarettes!

Trent cigarette

By 1989 the tobacco industry supplied 20 million dollars of the approximately 90 million dollars or 22% of the funds provided by corporate sponsors for sport in Australia. Tobacco companies could create a positive image for the practice of smoking by associating their products with famous sportspeople eg: Benson and Hedges secured the marketing rights for international cricket.

Benson and Hedges Cup

Taken from:  http://www.espncricinfo.com/magazine/content/story/523649.html

By making amendments to the Television and Broadcasting Act the Australian Government banned all advertising of tobacco companies and their products on radio and television in 1976. In 1990 it became illegal to advertise tobacco in newspapers and magazines. So tobacco companies increased funding to sponsorship of major sporting events, leagues, clubs and teams. In this way they could circumvent regulations and increase brand awareness.

In response, the Australian Government passed legislation to make it illegal to sponsor sport and for the Australian media to broadcast or publish an advertisement for tobacco. This is known as the Tobacco Advertising Prohibition Act of 1992 (Hoye, Russell; Nicholson, Matthew; Houlihan,Barrie; Sport and Policy: Issues and Analysis, page 89).
Some states had already implemented anti-smoking campaigns in the 1970s and 1980s. However, the Federal Government’s National Campaign Against Drug Abuse actually declared tobacco smoking as the major contributor to drug-related deaths in Australia, so health professionals and the Australian media had to take this issue seriously. A major television, cinema and print advertising campaign with the slogan ‘Smoking – who needs it?’ targeted teenage women and young adult women from 1990-1991. It was not until 1997 that a national Quit campaign involving a network of all Australian states and the Commonwealth was launched.

Check out http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-01-10/timeline3a-smoking-report-marks-50th-anniversary/5192838 for a timeline of key events in the anti-tobacco campaign in Australia.

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Way back when, Wednesdays

A golden celebration

Did you buy a house in Golden Grove during the 1980s or 1990s? The Leader Messenger featured an article about the milestone sale of a house and land package in the new development of Golden Grove, on page 3 of the issue dated 9 January 1987. The Delphin Property Group Ltd had started selling land in October 1985. People were buying blocks of land ‘off the plan’ and it was time to celebrate the Richter family’s move up to Golden Grove.

1000th family in Golden Grove

The origin of the suburb of Golden Grove is unusual. This is because the State Government and private enterprise worked together, adopting a fully planned approach to its development. The process began when the South Australian Land Commission began acquiring land for prospective housing in 1973. In 1983 Lend Lease/Delphin won the contract to build on the land and construction began in 1985.

Delphin launched a major marketing campaign to sell land in Golden Grove, encompassing advertising on television, radio, in newspapers and on billboards. There were even local newspaper style publications distributed to letterboxes of Adelaide residents, such as the Golden Grove Update and Everything you ever wanted to know about Golden Grove. When the Richter family purchased their house and land pack in the early stages of the Golden Grove development, Delphin used the slogan “Room to move”. The campaign was so successful that Delphin sold over 200 allotments during the first week of construction.

 

Duck billboard

Photo taken from:  Golden Grove, the Creation of a Special Place, A highly successful new community for 30,000 people, Delphin.

 

Golden Grove was innovative for the 1980s as it offered a range of housing options with a choice of allotment sizes. People who could not afford to buy a large, traditionally sized block of land could build a courtyard or villa home. This was also an option for older people who wanted to ‘downsize’ and purchase a smaller home with a low maintenance garden. People were attracted by the proposed extensive planting of trees and shrubs, landscaped streets, provision of open space (27% of land was set aside for this purpose) and the network of hiking and walking trails.

 

Housing styles

A variety of housing styles proved attractive to first home owners, families and retirees in the Golden Grove development. Photo taken from Golden Grove, the Creation of a Special Place, A highly successful new community for 30,000 people, Delphin.

Advertising focused on the concept of building a new community made up of a series of garden villages surrounding a central nucleus, where residents could access a variety of services. When constructed, the Golden Grove Village shopping centre would be an impressive retail facility. In conjunction with the Golden Grove Recreation & Arts Centre it would also have a community focus. People could meet and get together in the ‘Town Centre’. A transport hub was planned to link commuters with neighbouring suburbs, Tea Tree Plaza and Adelaide City.

 

Garden Villages

The logo used on promotional materials to sell land at Golden Grove

 

Golden Grove could offer parents the promise of primary school close to home. An essential feature of the Golden Grove development was the construction of a unique joint-use educational facility with three secondary schools sharing facilities: Golden Grove State High School, Gleeson Catholic College and Pedare Anglican and Uniting Church College. In total, 16 schools were originally proposed for the Golden Grove area. (Golden Grove, the Creation of a Special Place, A highly successful new community for 30,000 people, Delphin).

The population of Golden Grove has grown substantially since the time of the Messenger article. The last vacant block of land in Golden Grove was sold in 2002. The 2016 Census recorded 10,235 people living in Golden Grove and there were 4095 private dwellings in the suburb with an average of 2.6 people per household. Of course, people who moved into the new housing estates and still live there have got older too. The median age of residents is now 42. There are now 2955 families living in Golden Grove – with the average number of children per family recorded as 1.6 (http://www.censusdata.abs.gov.au/census_services/getproduct/census/2016/quickstat/SSC40511?opendocument).

The Golden Grove housing estate copies the name of the original small postal village of Golden Grove. However, there was never officially a township named Golden Grove. Local people called the settlement Golden Grove because it had been established in the vicinity of the Golden Grove Farm which was owned by Captain Adam Robertson.

 

Captain Robertson

Captain Adam Robertson

 

Captain Adam Robertson accompanied by his wife Elizabeth and his son and daughter had emmigrated from Britain in 1853. In 1842 Captain Robertson purchased a section of land from the South Australian Company on one of the headwaters of Cobbler’s Creek. By 1853 he owned nearly 1000 acres of land and he had built Golden Grove House for his family. We are told from his wife’s obituary in the Advertiser in 1888 that Captain Robertson named his property Golden Grove after the last ship that he commanded.

 

PH05246 Golden Grove House 1930

Golden Grove House in 1930

 

Captain Robertson did not approve of people referring to the country surrounding his property as Golden Grove. However Robertson had donated 4000m2 of his land for the construction of a local school in 1853 and he allowed it to be named Golden Grove Area School. In 1959, the Postmaster General designated the local general store and post office as the Golden Grove Post Office. So there was not a lot that the Captain could object to (Ian Auhl, Settlement to City, A History of the District of Tea Tree Gully 1836-1976, 1976-1993).

After Captain Robertson died at the age of 59 in 1864, his son John inherited the Golden Grove property. John continued to farm the land but he also grew grapevines. John is known for having served as a councillor and in the position of Chairman on the Tea Tree Gully Council and as a President of the Royal Agricultural and Horticultural Society. Golden Grove remained in the family until it was sold to Mr and Mrs A.J. Strachan in 1930. In 1972 Boral bought the majority of the estate for sand mining.

#waybackwhenwednesdays

 

 

Did you know…what to do with your Christmas leftovers?

If you are anything like me, you will no doubt have over-catered for Christmas. I actually believe that if you haven’t over catered, you are not catering properly! But after everyone has eaten their fill, what do you do with all those leftovers?

Here is one idea:

Christmas Leftover Risotto

Ingredients

  • 1 onion
  • 1 leek
  • 1-2 cloves of garlic
  • 1 heaped of thyme leaves
  • 200g of leftover turkey (shredded)
  • 200g of leftover ham (diced)
  • 300g Arborio rice
  • 1 glass of white wine
  • 1 litre of chicken or vegetable stock
  • 1/4 cup of grated parmesan (or any cheese you may have)
  • 1 tablespoon of butter
  • 1 tablespoon of cream cheese (optional)
  • Olive oil

Method

Heat the stock.

Chop up the leak, onion and garlic.

Heat some olive oil in a pan and add the leak, onion, garlic and thyme.

Once the leak and onion starts to turn transparent, add the white wine and bring to the boil before adding the rice and meat.

Reduce the heat and begin to ladle in the stock, stirring continuously. Cook for about 20 minutes, continuing to add stock as it is absorbed. It is important to keep the dish ‘wet’.

Once the rice is soft and the butter and cheese and stir through.

Serve immediately with some crusty bread.

Delicious!